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Headlines Statistically Speaking

ABUSED CHILDREN!
by Dr. Romulo A. Virola 1
Secretary General, NSCB

Are we taking good care of our children?

Last month, we read very alarming reports about children killing other children for disturbing reasons. Some of us quickly attributed this to a host of possible causes – the Internet, social networking, computer games, the Pinoy diaspora, etc, etc. A knee-jerk solution might be to ban or limit Internet access of children or discourage mothers from working abroad! Not necessarily wise, not necessarily wrong either.   But one thing is sure. Our children need protection, they need guidance, they  need our love and affection.

Statistically Speaking had previously written about children: “Our Children are at Risk2, “Save our Children3, “Statistics on Violence Against Women and Children: A Morally Rejuvenating Philippine Society?4,  “Our Christmas List for our Children5, and “Guilty and not Guilty!6. But with the spate of horrible news on children recently, and as we celebrate the National Statistics Month and the National Children’s Month in October, it behooves us to once again focus attention on some statistics about children. 1

Children and women are two of the poorest basic sectors of Philippine society with poverty incidence of 34.8% and 25.1%, respectively, in 2006, behind fishermen and farmers7! Children by their  innocence about the ways of the world, are surely vulnerable; and while many Pinays are successful  and productive professionals, there are many women who are also exposed to various kinds of risk. It is therefore  incumbent on the duty-bearers of our children and women to assess the quality of social protection they receive.

Many agencies of government are mandated to provide services to children and to look after their well-being. These include the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the Department of Education (DepEd),  the Department of Health (DOH), the Philippine National Police (PNP), the Council for the Welfare of Children (CWC), the Early Childhood Care and Development Council (ECCDC), the Philippine Youth Commission, the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, etc. And while these agencies are not without their share of bureaucratic inefficiency and ineffectiveness, they  surely have hardworking  women and men who do their best to deliver high quality service to their stakeholders. But with the social ills we have confronted lately, their best is obviously not good enough, unfortunately.

Other duty-bearers include the church, schools, the community,  Congress, the media,  civil society, and of course, the family. Where and why have these institutions  failed? If one remembers, Statistically Speaking had reported that non-random surveys of different groups, including professionals, government employees, private sector employees, members of the military, and the low income group showed8 that the family is the most important source of happiness  among Pinoys. The family is therefore pivotal in the functioning of our society and it is crucial that the family be protected and preserved as a social institution that lays the foundation for our well being especially those of our children. Social scientists should probably study whether the cohesiveness of the Pinoy family has weakened; if so, why and whether this could be a major reason for the social problems we have with our children.

As many of us have finally realized, statistics inform decisions. Towards evidence-based decision making therefore, let us look at some statistics to help us craft more effective programs and policies for the protection of our children. In addition to those previously cited by Statistically Speaking, this article features the available statistics on  child abuse cases served by the DSWD. We are grateful to the DSWD for collecting, processing and sharing the information with the public.  It would be useful if Bantay Bata Foundation and other duty-bearers from the private sector also systematically collected and disseminated  data on children.

What do the DSWD statistics say?

CHILD ABUSE CASES, 2009-2010

The DSWD classifies child abuse cases as abandoned, neglected, sexually abused, sexually exploited, physically abused/maltreated, victims of child labor, victims of illegal recruitment, victims of child trafficking, victims of armed conflict, and others (emotionally abused, etc.). They are served by the DSWD thru facilities all over the country. (Table 1)2

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The number of child abuse cases served by the DSWD went down from 6,524 in 2009 to 4,749 in 2010. As with Children in Conflict with the Law (CICL) cited in last month’s Statistically Speaking, we do not know if this reflects a reduction in actual child abuse cases, or a reduction in the capacity of the DSWD to serve abused children.  But while 94% of CICL are boys, about two-thirds of child abuse cases served by the DSWD are girls. (Table 2) 3

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The regions  with the most number of child abuse cases served are NCR, Central Visayas, Central Luzon, Cagayan Valley, and Zamboanga Peninsula. The reduction in the number of cases served came mainly from Zamboanga Peninsula.(Table 2)

4

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More than half of the child abuse victims are aged 10 to below 18 years ( 52.8 % in 2009 and 55.4 % in 2010). Revolting is the fact that about one out of four victims is aged below five years old ( 24.7 % in 2009 and 24.6 % in 2010) .  (Table 2)

5

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By category, more than one-half of abused children served by the DSWD have either been abandoned or neglected, comprising the most common cases (53.7% in 2009 and 52.9 % in 2010). Why are they abandoned and/or neglected? Are these innocent children victims of unwanted pregnancies, or of abject poverty? (Table 3)

 

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After abandoned/neglected children,  sexually abused children are the second most common cases handled by DSWD, ( 29.6 % in 2009 and 27.3 % in 2010)  . And despite the Anti-Rape Law of 1997 (Republic Act (RA) No. 8353), the most common sexual abuse is rape, followed by incest and acts of lasciviousness. Rape victims are predominantly female ( 97.6 % in 2009 and 90.5 % in 2010). One wonders whether the prohibition under RA 9346 in 2006 of the death penalty originally possible for convicted rape offenders under certain conditions has contributed to this social problem. And quite worrisome is the relatively large number of incest cases ( 32.9 %  of sexual abuse in 2009 and 37.5 % in 2010), calling attention to the breakdown of the family as a social institution. Does the CWC have a program to address this sensitive social issue? (Table 3)

 

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Some victims of child labor are only 5 to below 10  years old ( 5 cases in 2009 and 9 cases in 2010) (Tables 4A and 4B)

 

 

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Victims of pedophilia have been reported in Eastern Visayas, NCR, and MIMAROPA. (Tables 4A and 4B)

 

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Most of the sexually-exploited children are either victims 9of prostitution or of cyber pornography ( 48.5 % and 33.8 %, respectively in 2009 and 52.0 % and 31.5 %, respectively,  in 2010). But while the overall number of child abuse cases handled by the DSWD declined from 2009 to 2010, child prostitution cases went up slightly  from 63 in 2009 to 66 in 2010. Cyber pornography victims are served in NCR, Central Visayas, Zamboanga Peninsula, and Ilocos Region.  And while the absolute number of cyber pornography cases may  be small, there could possibly be many more, as is probably the case with child prostitution,  who have not sought help from the DSWD. This should serve as a stern warning about the danger of allowing children unguided access to the Internet. And take note in  which regions this could more likely be taking place.  (Tables 3, 4A and 4B)

The above statistics do not tell a good story about our society. Certainly, the same story may be true of perhaps many other countries. And so, given these statistics, all duty-bearers must do something before it is too late. For our  children! For our future!

Last week, we opened our annual celebration of the National Statistics Month (NSM) with the theme “Quality Social Protection Statistics for Focused Targeting: Improving Outcomes, Changing Lives”, or “Kalidad na Estadistika sa Pangangalagang Panlipunan: Pagpapahusay ng Gawa, Pagpapaunlad ng Buhay”. With the DSWD as host of the opening ceremonies, Sec. Corazon “Dinky” Juliano-Soliman served as keynote speaker and launched the National Household Targeting System for Poverty Reduction (NHTS-PR) Database.  The Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Program and the DSWD have received criticisms from some sectors of our society, methinks for selfish reasons in some cases,  but the NHTS-PR database offers excellent potentials as a tool for poverty reduction programs, not only for the DSWD, but also for all other government agencies and even the private sector and the research community.  We therefore hope that other efforts of government to establish information systems such as registries of farmers, fisherfolk, PhilHealth and agrarian reform beneficiaries, among others,  will build on the NHTS-PR database, and not go their own separate ways, which would be a waste of our precious little resources. Together with the DSWD presentation, Directors Jessamyn O. Encarnacion and Candido J. Astrologo of the NSCB also launched the Philippine Poverty Statistics Portal (http://www.nscb.gov.ph/poverty/portal ), another potentially powerful statistical information management tool developed by the NSCB in collaboration with the  interagency Technical Working Group on Poverty Monitoring and Indicator Systems created by the Cabinet Cluster on Human Development and Poverty Reduction. On October 28,  the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas will once again host the NSM closing ceremonies simultaneously with the BSP-DepEd statistical oratorical contest among fourth year high school students in the National Capital Region. Please visit our NSM calendar of activities athttp://www.nscb.gov.ph/nsm/22ndNSM/activities.asp

Many of our kababayans suffered damage caused by typhoon Pedring and Quiel that hit us during the last week of the third quarter. Kudos to our dedicated women and men of the military and the local government units (LGUs) and national government officials who did a wonderful job helping our kababayans in distress.  We now pray that the typhoons still to come won’t be as disastrous, but let us continue to  be careful and always be prepared. Based on experience, these typhoons   come the  strongest9 in the fourth quarter of the year, and the deadliest in November!

Meanwhile, we join the rest of the world in mourning the passing of the iPod, iPhone, and iPad genius, Steve Jobs; but we are confident another exceptionally gifted human being will follow his footsteps, as long as we follow our heart and we love what we do.

Happy 22nd National Statistics Month, Happy National Children’s Month! 

 

 

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the author at ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph

 

_______________
1 Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) and Chairman of the Statistical Research and Training Center (SRTC). He holds a Ph. D. in Statistics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, U.S.A. and has taught mathematics and statistics at the University of the Philippines. He is also a past president of the Philippine Statistical Association. The author thanks Jessamyn O. Encarnacion, Cynthia S. Regalado, Bernadette B. Balamban, Noel S. Nepomuceno, Teresita M. Almarines, Anna Jean G. Casanas, Candido J. Astrologo, Jr., Ma. Libertie V. Masculino, Sonny U. Gutierrez, Albert A. Garcia, Andrea C. Baylon, and Edgard E. Enrado for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB.

2 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/061306_rav_children.asp

3 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2008/061008_rav_children.asp

4 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2008/090808_rav_wedc.asp

5 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2009/121409_rav_joe_children.asp

6 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2011/091211.asp

7 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2011/071111_rav.asp#tab9

8 Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2010/110810_rav_joe_happiness.asp

9 See Statistically Speaking article http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2008/081408_rav_typhoons.asp

 

 

 

Table 1. Facilities Involved in the Distribution of Social Services, 2009-2010

 

CY 2009 CY 2010
Residential Facilities
Reception and Study Center for Children  11  11
Group Home for Girls/ Marillac Hills   14    12
Haven for Children 2     2
Nayon ng Kabataan  1   1
Lingap Center   1  1
AMOR Village  1   1
Yhostel   1  1
Regional Rehabilitation Center for Youth 1/   9 13
Home for Boys 2/   1    -  
National Training School for Boys 3/    1     1
Regional Haven for Women  13   13
Sanctuary    1  1
Elsie Gaches Village   1   1
Golden Acres / Home for Elderly/
Home for Aged
 3  3
Jose Fabella Center   1   1
Center for Restorative  Activities, Development and Learning Center (CRADLE) 4/   1    1
Processing Center for Displaced Persons 5/      1    1
TOTAL    63   64
Non-Residential Facilities
RSW/NVRC/AVRC      5   5
INA Healing Center      1    1
Center for Handicapped    1   1
TOTAL    7 7
     
GRAND TOTAL    70 71

Note:
1/ Four (4) newly contructed RRCYs operationalized in 2010. These are the RRCYs in Regions CAR, II, IV-B and XII
2/ Facility was closed in 2010
3/ Caters children in conflict with the law (CICL) cases
4/ Caters CICL cases in NCR but the facility is maintained and operationalized by Bureau of Jail Management and Penology (BJMP). DSWD counterpart is provision of social workers for case management
5/ Caters cases of deportees particularly from Sabah, Malaysia

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 2. Child Abuse Cases Served by the Department of Social Welfare
and Development (DSWD), 2009 - 2010
Community Based and Center Based

  Child Abuse Cases Served
2009 2010
Both Sexes Male Female Both Sexes Male Female
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %
 Total Philippines  6,524 100.0 2,208 33.8 4,316   66.2 4,749 100.0 1,611  33.9 3,138  66.1
                         
   National Capital Region    663 10.2 225 33.9 438 66.1 1,404 29.6 570 40.6 834 59.4
   Cordillera Administrative Region  208 3.2     74  35.6   134  64.4 136    2.9 56 41.2    80 58.8
   I  Ilocos Region  415     6.4  114 27.5 301 72.5 162 3.4 17 10.5 145 89.5
   II  Cagayan Valley  499   7.6 192 38.5 307 61.5 247   5.2 159 64.4  88 35.6
   III  Central Luzon  660 10.1 156 23.6 504 76.4 738 15.5 290 39.3 448 60.7
   IV-A  CALABARZON  106  1.6   24 22.6     82 77.4 109 2.3 11 10.1    98 89.9
   IV-B  MIMAROPA     87   1.3     27 31.0      60 69.0     74   1.6 5 6.8    69 93.2
   V  Bicol Region  187    2.9    66 35.3 121 64.7 151 3.2 39 25.8  112 74.2
   VI  Western Visayas     195    3.0    49 25.1    146 74.9 213     4.5 54 25.4 159 74.6
   VII  Central Visayas  867 13.3 310 35.8  557 64.2 406   8.5 95 23.4  311 76.6
   VIII  Eastern Visayas  396    6.1   121 30.6     275 69.4  223  4.7 66 29.6 157 70.4
   IX  Zamboanga Peninsula  1,485 22.8  607 40.9 878 59.1 231   4.9 50 21.6 181 78.4
   X  Northern Mindanao   336   5.2 111 33.0 225 67.0 221  4.7 78  35.3   143  64.7
   XI  Davao Region  189   2.9    70 37.0 119 63.0 185    3.9 56 30.3  129 69.7
   XII  SOCCSKSARGEN    154    2.4      46 29.9 108 70.1 162 3.4 51 31.5     111 68.5
   XIII  Caraga     77  1.2    16 20.8 61 79.2  87    1.8 14 16.1   73 83.9
                         
 Age Group  6,524 100.0 2,208 33.8 4,316 66.2 4,749 100.0 1,611         33.9 3,138 66.1
  0   to below   1  550  8.4 296 53.8 254 46.2  412  8.7 232 56.3 180 43.7
  1   to below   5  1,061 16.3 525 49.5 536 50.5 753 15.9 372         49.4 381 50.6
  5   to below   10  1,417 21.7  535 37.8 882 62.2 884 18.6 416         47.1 468 52.9
 10  to below   14  1,585 24.3 457 28.8 1,128 71.2 1,062 22.4 294         27.7 768 72.3
 14  to below   18  1,862 28.5 371 19.9 1,491 80.1 1,565 33.0 259         16.5 1,306 83.5
 No Age Bracket    49 0.8   24 49.0  25 51.0    73   1.5   38         52.1    35 47.9

Source of basic data: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 3. Child Abuse Cases Served by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) by Category, 2009 - 2010

  Child Abuse Cases Served
2009 2010
Both Sexes Male Female Both Sexes Male Female
No. % No. % No. % No. % No. % No. %
 Total Philippines  6,524 100.0 2,208 33.8 4,316   66.2 4,749 100.0 1,611  33.9 3,138  66.1
                         
 Abandoned  1,091 16.7  593  54.4 498 45.6 1,433 30.2 775 54.1 658 45.9
 Neglected  2,412 37.0 1,197 49.6 1,215 50.4 1,079 22.7 588 54.5  491 45.5
 Sexually-Abused    29.6           27.3        
    Rape  1,097 56.9    26     2.4 1,071 97.6 707 54.6   67 9.5 640 90.5
    Incest  635 32.9 0  -   635 100.0 485 37.5       5  1.0  480 99.0
    Acts of Lasciviousness  197 10.2        5   2.5 192 97.5 103   8.0      7   6.8    96 93.2
    Sub-total  1,929 100.0   31   1.6 1,898 98.4 1,295 100.0   79 6.1 1,216 93.9
 Sexually-Exploited     2.0           2.7        
    Victims of Prostitution      63 48.5 0      -   63 100.0    66   52.0 0     -        66 100.0
    Victims of Pedophilia      20  15.4          1   5.0     19 95.0     13 10.2     6 46.2    7 53.8
    Victims of Pornography         3     2.3 0      -          3 100.0       8      6.3    1 12.5       7 87.5
    Victims of Cyber Pornography     44  33.8   22 50.0     22 50.0     40 31.5 0  -   40 100.0
    Sub-total  130 100.0 23 17.7 107 82.3 127 100.0      7  5.5 120  94.5
 Physically Abused/Maltreated  587   9.0   291 49.6  296 50.4 304    6.4 104 34.2 200  65.8
 Victims of Child Labor    83 1.3  28  33.7     55 66.3     69   1.5       14 20.3 55 79.7
 Victims of Illegal Recruitment   7   0.1 0     -          7 100.0          2  0.0 0    -           2 100.0
 Victims of Child Trafficking  221 3.4  23 10.4 198 89.6 390 8.2    22  5.6 368     94.4
 Victims of Armed Conflict     0.4               0.6        
    Involved  7  29.2      2 28.6     5 71.4     3 10.0         1 33.3       2 66.7
    Affected   17 70.8         6 35.3   11 64.7    27 90.0        3 11.1    24 88.9
    Sub-total  24 100.0        8 33.3   16 66.7 30 100.0       4 13.3   26  86.7
 Others   40 0.6     14 35.0     26 65.0 20 0.4  18 90.0 2  10.0

Source of basic data: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

 

Table 4A. Number of Child Abuse Cases Served by the
Department of Social Welfare and Development,
By Type of Abuse, By Sex, By Age, By Region, 2009

  Number of Child Abuse Cases Served Abandoned Merged Number of Child Abuse Cases Served, By Type of Abuse Percent (%) Distribution of TOTAL CHILD ABUSE CASES SERVED
Sexually-Abused Sexually-Exploited Physically Abused/ Maltreated Victims of Child Labor Victims of Illegal Recruitment Victims of Child Trafficking Victims of Armed Conflict Others 1/
Total Rape Incest Acts of Lasciviousness Total Victims of Prostitution Victims of Pedophilia Victims of Pornography Victims of Cyber Pornography Total Involved Affected
Both Sexes Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
 Total Philippines  6,524 2,208 4,316 593 498 1,197 1,215 31 1,898 26 1,071 0 635 5 192 23 107 0 63 1 19 0 3 22 22 291 296 28 55 0 7 23 198 8 16 2 5 6 11 14 26 100.00%
                                                                                     
   National Capital Region  663 225 438 98 62 86 76 3 143 0 72 0 50 3 21 0 29 0 21 0 5 0 0 0 3 26 32 5 25 0 0 7 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10.16%
   Cordillera Administrative Region  208 74 134 23 11 48 45 0 67 0 46 0 3 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.19%
   I  Ilocos Region  415 114 301 73 71 33 51 1 156 1 94 0 49 0 13 0 9 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 4 7 10 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6.36%
   II  Cagayan Valley  499 192 307 10 10 156 155 0 124 0 72 0 50 0 2 0 9 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 8 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7.65%
   III  Central Luzon  660 156 504 63 33 48 46 0 299 0 198 0 60 0 41 0 17 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 32 48 8 9 0 0 3 49 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 10.12%
   IV-A  CALABARZON  106 24 82 4 12 7 6 3 50 3 13 0 30 0 7 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 10 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.62%
   IV-B  MIMAROPA  87 27 60 15 14 9 8 3 38 1 17 0 12 2 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.33%
   V  Bicol Region  187 66 121 12 7 39 36 8 66 8 24 0 39 0 3 0 4 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 6 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.87%
   VI  Western Visayas  195 49 146 32 43 2 1 0 86 0 56 0 23 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 11 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 1 4 0 0 2.99%
   VII  Central Visayas  867 310 557 82 78 159 168 0 224 0 121 0 82 0 21 0 9 0 7 0 0 0 1 0 1 68 54 0 0 0 1 1 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13.29%
   VIII  Eastern Visayas  396 121 275 14 19 91 102 1 90 1 45 0 43 0 2 0 10 0 1 0 9 0 0 0 0 13 23 1 8 0 2 0 12 1 6 0 1 1 5 0 3 6.07%
   IX  Zamboanga Peninsula  1,485 607 878 54 53 430 444 10 288 10 161 0 90 0 37 23 17 0 1 1 2 0 0 22 14 68 54 12 5 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 9 13 22.76%
   X  Northern Mindanao  336 111 225 34 44 53 40 0 104 0 72 0 32 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 22 17 0 3 0 1 1 8 1 5 0 4 1 1 0 1 5.15%
   XI  Davao Region  189 70 119 28 17 29 30 2 49 2 27 0 17 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 16 0 3 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2.90%
   XII  SOCCSKSARGEN  154 46 108 38 21 4 6 0 59 0 31 0 24 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 18 4 1 1 0 3 1 0 0 2.36%
   XIII  Caraga  77 16 61 13 3 3 1 0 55 0 22 0 31 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.18%
                                                                                     
 Age Group  6,524 2,208 4,316 593 498 1,197 1,215 31 1,898 26 1,071 0 635 5 192 23 107 0 63 1 19 0 3 22 22 291 296 28 55 0 7 23 198 8 16 2 5 6 11 14 26 100.00%
  0   to below   1  550 296 254 120 92 161 130 0 19 0 9 0 6 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 3 0 0 0 0 8 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 8.43%
  1   to below   5  1,061 525 536 196 139 289 301 0 65 0 45 0 9 0 11 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 33 21 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 16.26%
  5   to below   10  1,417 535 882 115 122 319 353 12 305 11 160 0 99 1 46 5 11 0 3 1 3 0 0 4 5 79 73 1 4 0 0 0 4 3 2 0 0 3 2 1 8 21.72%
 10  to below   14  1,585 457 1,128 73 84 232 244 7 627 5 352 0 224 2 51 12 25 0 10 0 11 0 2 12 2 114 107 10 24 0 1 2 9 2 5 1 2 1 3 5 2 24.29%
 14  to below   18  1,862 371 1,491 81 55 187 180 12 882 10 505 0 297 2 80 6 67 0 50 0 5 0 0 6 12 61 85 17 27 0 6 1 170 3 9 1 3 2 6 3 10 28.54%
 No Age Bracket  49 24 25 8 6 9 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 7 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.75%

Note:
0 No reported cases
1/ Others include emotionally abused, sexually abused/molested, exploited children, etc.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 4B. Number of Child Abuse Cases Served by the
Department of Social Welfare and Development,
By Type of Abuse, By Sex, By Age, By Region, 2010

  Number of Child Abuse Cases Served Abandoned Merged Number of Child Abuse Cases Served, By Type of Abuse Percent (%) Distribution of TOTAL CHILD ABUSE CASES SERVED
Sexually-Abused Sexually-Exploited Physically Abused/ Maltreated Victims of Child Labor Victims of Illegal Recruitment Victims of Child Trafficking Victims of Armed Conflict Others 1/
Total Rape Incest Acts of Lasciviousness Total Victims of Prostitution Victims of Pedophilia Victims of Pornography Victims of Cyber Pornography Total Involved Affected
Both Sexes Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
 Total Philippines  4,749 1,611 3,138 775 658 588 491 79 1,216 67 640 5 480 7 96 7 120 0 66 6 7 1 7 0 40 104 200 14 55 0 2 22 368 4 26 1 2 3 24 18 2 100.00%
                                                                                     
   National Capital Region  1,404 570 834 352 370 137 91 26 142 23 72 0 49 3 21 0 56 0 28 0 0 0 0 0 28 34 48 7 39 0 0 14 72 0 16 0 0 0 16 0 0 29.56%
   Cordillera Administrative Region  136 56 80 22 15 32 26 0 25 0 15 0 9 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.86%
   I  Ilocos Region  162 17 145 10 13 6 13 0 92 0 31 0 51 0 10 0 8 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.41%
   II  Cagayan Valley  247 159 88 4 8 104 14 38 45 37 37 1 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 7 0 2 0 0 5 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5.20%
   III  Central Luzon  738 290 448 129 78 128 79 6 192 2 129 0 44 4 19 4 7 0 5 3 1 1 1 0 0 19 34 3 3 0 0 1 55 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15.54%
   IV-A  CALABARZON  109 11 98 4 0 6 13 0 64 0 18 0 40 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.30%
   IV-B  MIMAROPA  74 5 69 0 0 4 12 0 37 0 22 0 9 0 6 0 6 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.56%
   V  Bicol Region  151 39 112 20 11 18 28 0 61 0 18 0 37 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.18%
   VI  Western Visayas  213 54 159 46 46 2 6 0 80 0 58 0 18 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10 0 4 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.49%
   VII  Central Visayas  406 95 311 34 30 37 56 1 97 0 48 1 43 0 6 3 26 0 8 3 0 0 6 0 12 18 32 2 2 0 2 0 66 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8.55%
   VIII  Eastern Visayas  223 66 157 21 9 36 46 0 58 0 23 0 30 0 5 0 6 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 3 2 2 0 0 0 25 3 8 0 2 3 6 0 0 4.70%
   IX  Zamboanga Peninsula  231 50 181 24 12 20 23 0 117 0 58 0 55 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 21 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.86%
   X  Northern Mindanao  221 78 143 43 19 32 27 0 70 0 43 0 25 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 9 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.65%
   XI  Davao Region  185 56 129 23 21 14 18 0 58 0 34 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 18 1 2 1 0 0 2 18 2 3.90%
   XII  SOCCSKSARGEN  162 51 111 31 18 10 28 8 36 5 16 3 18 0 2 0 6 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.41%
   XIII  Caraga  87 14 73 12 8 2 11 0 42 0 18 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.83%
                                                                                     
 Age Group  4,749 1,611 3,138 775 658 588 491 79 1,216 67 640 5 480 7 96 7 120 0 66 6 7 1 7 0 40 104 200 14 55 0 2 22 368 4 26 1 2 3 24 18 2 100.00%
  0   to below   1  412 232 180 136 105 76 59 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2 0 0 0 2 18 2 8.68%
  1   to below   5  753 372 381 220 168 134 116 0 32 0 19 0 13 0 0 0 42 0 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 19 0 0 0 0 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15.86%
  5   to below   10  893 425 468 222 173 140 99 21 134 18 69 0 57 3 8 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 31 44 7 2 0 0 0 12 4 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 18.80%
 10  to below   14  1,061 293 768 99 112 136 122 36 403 30 215 2 154 4 34 4 30 0 10 3 5 1 5 0 10 16 59 0 6 0 0 2 32 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 0 22.34%
 14  to below   18  1,557 251 1,306 82 96 88 89 19 633 19 326 0 253 0 54 3 44 0 14 3 2 0 2 0 26 40 72 6 38 0 2 13 312 0 20 0 2 0 18 0 0 32.79%
 No Age Bracket  73 38 35 16 4 14 6 3 10 0 7 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 1 9 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.54%

 

Note:
0 No reported cases
1/ Others include emotionally abused, sexually abused/molested, exploited children, etc.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

 

 

Posted: 10 October 2011.

 

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