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Headlines Statistically Speaking

Seniors’ Moments
by Dr. Romulo A. Virola 1
Secretary General, NSCB

The Philippine GDP Gets a Facelift!Is Philippine society taking good care of its senior citizens?

For starters, for every 100 people you meet in your usual environment2, can you tell the number of those who sometimes take pride in calling themselves the  “young once”? The number of those who actually need our attention? Our help? Our tender loving care?

At present, one out of 73 people on earth is a Pinoy! And our society is relatively young, growing faster than the older societies like those of Japan, the United States and countries in Europe 3. Children 4 comprise 39.2 percent of the total population of the country this year.  The senior citizens5 account for 6.9 percent but this will increase to approximately 7.8 percent by the end of the Aquino administration! And by 2040, it is projected that out of 141.7 million Filipinos, approximately 19.6 million will be “young once”! Indeed, the share of seniors to total population has been steadily increasing over time, from 5.3 percent in 1980 to 6.0 percent in 2000 to 6.9 percent in 2011 to 13.8 percent in 2040. Likewise, the average age of the Pinoys has been increasing from 22.5 years in 1980 to 24.7 years in 2000 to 26.6 years in 2011 to 33.3 years in 2040!  (Tables 1, 2, and 3, Figure 1)

A Pinoy born this year is expected to live 67.05  years if a boy and 72.58 years if a girl. Life expectancy is of course increasing due to advances in medicine and in the current quinquennium covering the period 2010-2015, on the average, 3.6 months will be added every year to our life expectancy at birth  Yes, the Philippine population is ageing and certain types of doctors and clinics will continue to make millions.  (Tables 4a and 4b)

Seriously, senior citizens constitute an important sector of any society. They work as judges and justices, senators and congressmen, full professors in universities and colleges, school principals,  lay leaders in churches, and of course, lolos and lolas to ‘em cute little rascals! But there are also many of them living in nursing homes, sick in hospitals, begging on the streets, even wandering thru life by their lonesome selves. Cognizant of this, Republic Act (RA) 8425, or the Social Reform and Poverty Alleviation Act, included them as one of the basic (or “disadvantaged”) sectors in Philippine society. 

In the light of our ageing population and the vulnerability of our senior citizens, let us ask ourselves, “Is someone looking after them?”  Is government doing enough to look after them?  Statistically Speaking  will now spend some moments for those at the top of the population pyramid – the wiser women and men of our society.

Pero bago magkalimutan ang lahat…

In 2010, we had approximately 6.4 million senior citizens! (Table 5)

Region IV-A, NCR, and Region III accounted for more than 35 percent of the country’s  senior citizens in 2010, with shares of 12.2% (or 778,700), 11.9% (or 757,600), and 11.3% (or 721,400), respectively. Regions with the lowest share of senior citizens to total are: CAR (1.7%), ARMM (2.5%), and Caraga (2.6%). (Table 5)

While Region IV-A, NCR and Region III are home to the biggest number of senior citizens, the “oldest” regions are Regions I, VI, and Region VIII, with population shares of senior citizens of  16.6%, 7.9%, and 7.6%, respectively. Saluyot has really been doing wonders in extending the life of Ilocanos! (Table 5)

In terms of some of their socio-demographic characteristics,

Among our senior citizens, there are relatively more women (3.4 million or 54.0%) than men (2.9 million or 46.0%)!  This is not surprising as the worldwide trend is that women outlive men.  Actually, among the younger seniors, men are not that badly outnumbered by women (48.7% men, 51.3% women in the 60-64 age group); however, despite advances in medicine, men just do not have lasting power –among the octogenarians, the nonagenarians, the centenarians, 60.8% are women. As some friends at the Philippine Commission on Women (PCW) would proclaim, indeed, women is the stronger sex!  (Table 6

In fact, a person 61 years old now is expected to live 23 more years if a woman; but only 21 years if a man.  (Table 7)

Can this pose  a problem to our single senior ladies na naghahanap ng kanilang Pio-lolo or why not,  Piolo Pascual?

Well, of the 486,514 brides in 2008, 1,546 or 0.3 percent of them were senior citizens!  Sabi nga ng isang manghuhula, may asim pa!  (Table 8)

However, the share of senior citizen brides to the total number has been decreasing over time, from 0.41% in 2004 down to 0.39% in 2006 to 0.32% in 2008! (Table 8)

And of the 486,514 grooms in the same year, 5,406 or 1.1 percent of them were senior citizens! From 2004 to 2008, our lolos, with the availability of modern medicines, also celebrated their honeymoons with younger brides! (Table 8Hmmm, malakas pa ang sipa ng lolo!

And now, for the important question…  Are we taking good care of our senior citizens?

In the Official Poverty Statistics for the Basic Sectors6 compiled by the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), senior citizens consistently posted the 6th highest (or 3rd lowest) poverty incidence among the eight basic sectors in the Philippines with 15.1% in 2003 and 16.2% in 2006. (Table 9)

Senior citizens  are actually relatively “better off” than the general population which posted a poverty incidence of 24.9% in 2003 and 26.4% in 2006. (Table 9)

Regions which posted the highest poverty incidence among senior citizens in 2006 were ARMM (34.3%), Region IX (31.0%), and Region VII (29.5%). (Table 10)

In terms of the number of poor senior citizens,

There were 0.8 million and 1.0 million poor senior citizens in 2003 and 2006, respectively, compared to the total poor population of 19.8 million in 2003 and 22.2 million in 2006. Thus, our poor senior citizens comprised 4.0% and 4.7% of the poor population in 2003 and 2006, respectively. (Table 11)

The biggest numbers of poor senior citizens in 2006 were living in Region VII (169,019), Region V (105,220), and Region VIII (92,819). (Table 12)

How are we providing  for our senior citizens? 

Many of our senior citizens are now retired, and many of them have their retirement pensions as the only regular source of income.  We requested for data from the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS)7 and we are grateful that in such a short notice, they were able to provide us the data we needed. Last Friday, we went to the GSIS for our Unified Multi-Purpose ID (UMID) and the quality of service provided was truly impressive8. Come to think of it, we have not been hearing complaints about GSIS lately, have we? Congratulations to GSIS and keep it up!

The number of GSIS pensioners who are senior citizens increased by 4.9 percent between 2008 and 2009; 5.6 percent between 2009 and 2010.  As of 31 December 2010, the total number of GSIS pensioners who are senior citizens is 199,579. (Table 13)

Between 2008 and 2010, women account for more than half of the GSIS pensioners who are senior citizens– 56.1% in 2008, 57.5% in 2009, and 58.4% in 2010. (Table 13)

In terms of average monthly pension,

The average monthly pension of a GSIS pensioner who is a senior citizen is only PhP 7,768 in 2008, PhP 8,359 in 2009, and PhP 8,586 in 2010.  This is slightly above the salary of a minimum wage earner (working 26 days a month) for all regions, except for Region IV-A, where it is short by 6 percent in 2008, and for NCR, where it is short by approximately 20 percent for 2008-2010.   (Tables 13 and 14)

On the average, the monthly GSIS pension of women who are senior citizens is higher by approximately PhP 1,000 than their men counterparts. (Table 13)

 The average monthly pensions of GSIS pensioners who are senior citizens registered an increase of  7.6% in 2008-2009 and a much slower 2.7% in 2009-20109. In reality, the GSIS only approved a 1.5% increase in pensions effective January 201010. (Table 13)

However, average increases of prices of all items between 2009 and 2010 are 3.6% and 3.8% among all income and bottom 30 percent households, respectively!  Thus, during this period, the average monthly GSIS pensions did not increase as fast as prices of general commodities! (Table 15)  Certainly, the pensions of your lolos at lolas have been eroded!  So if you used to go to your lola para humingi ng pantoma11, time for you to pay back!

Let us take the cases of Lola Basyang and Professor X12.

Lola Basyang is now 84 years old.  She retired in 1990 as a Teacher III, after having served the government for 30 years.  She is currently receiving a monthly pension of PhP 5,069.  (Table 16)

In the case of Professor X, she is now 91 years old.  She retired in 1987 as Full Professor, after having served the government for almost 42 years.  She is now receiving a monthly pension of PhP 14,762.  (Table 17)

How do  pensions of Lola Basyang and Professor X compare with the per capita poverty thresholds13 as well as with the present salaries of the positions they left when they retired?

Between 2009 and 2011, the gap between their monthly pensions and the average monthly per capita poverty thresholds has narrowed! (Tables 16 and 17) While their pensions are still sufficient for the needs of one person, senior citizens at some point will need caregivers and so, if we want to reduce poverty among senior citizens, unless they are given much more support, achieving our goal will be at risk!

As of this year, the monthly basic salaries of a Teacher III and Full Professor are PhP 18,333 and PhP 62,752, respectively.  Thus, in 2009, Lola Basyang’s and Professor X’s monthly pensions were only one-third of the current salaries of the positions they retired from; and this year, the ratio has gone down to only one-fourth! (Tables 16 and 17) After long years of dedicated service in government, molding the minds of our youth, and contributing to the creation of  human capital in our country, Lola Basyang and Professor X certainly deserve a much better pension scheme!

Health is of course a critical concern among the senior citizens. And in the Philippine Happiness Index (PHI) developed by the NSCB14, health is one of the most important sources of happiness among surveyed respondents. So, how are we providing for the health needs of our senior citizens?

Based on the Philippine National Health Accounts (PNHA)15 compiled by the NSCB, the average per capita health expenditure was PhP 2,642 in 2007.  The senior citizens most certainly spend more than the average so an annual health insurance premium subsidy of at least PhP2,642 for our senior citizens would be something that the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) can consider in lieu of the at-need-assistance that it currently gives.  Assuming of course, that there will be kind-hearted Health Maintenance Organizations  that are willing to underwrite the risk.

The leading causes of death of our senior citizens are cerebrovascular disease, acute myocardial infarction, and chronic lower respiratory diseases, for which many doctors charge not exactly discounted rates! (Tables 18a, 18b, and 18c)

The share of private out of pocket health expenditure in 2007 was 54.3% while the share of government in the total health expenditure was only 26.2%.15  Yes, medical bills eat a big portion of the budget of our senior citizens and if the RH Bill has been taking too long to resolve, maybe Congress will be appreciated more if they can pass pronto a Health Insurance Act for Senior Citizens. And we won’t mind if it does not cover mga pampa-botox at other enhancers ng  mga lola at lolo?

Efforts to Help our Senior Citizens!

Aside from the 20%  legislated discount that senior citizens are entitled to on many food and other expenditure items, the priority lanes when queuing for services, the  birthday gifts, Christmas cash bonuses and free movie passes in some local government units (LGUs), etc., in  fairness, our government has been exerting efforts to lighten the burden of our senior citizens.

This year, the GSIS   entered into a partnership with the National Statistics Office (NSO) for the two agencies to exchange information records of pensioners in their respective databases.  This will provide a more pensioner-friendly basis for the GSIS in determining the eligibility of pensioners to continue to receive their pension.  Starting  May 2011, GSIS pensioners,  no longer need to undergo an inconvenient process to ensure the continuous receipt of their monthly pensions.16  This is welcome news to all our senior pensioners, including Lola Basyang and Professor X!  Kudos to GSIS and the NSO on this partnership! 

You may recall that in 2008, the Project “Katas ng VAT-Tulong Para Kay Lolo at Lola” was implemented nationwide by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in coordination with the LGUs and the Office of Senior Citizens Affairs (OSCA).  This Project gave a one-time cash subsidy of PhP 500 for qualified senior citizens funded through revenues generated  from the expanded value added tax or EVAT collection17.  According to the Program Management Bureau of the DSWD, the Project covered a total of 1.3 million qualified beneficiaries18, which was implemented between August 2008 and 2010.

The Philippine Plan of Action for Senior Citizens (PPASC) 2006-2010 was formulated to spell out the strategies, programs, projects and activities contributing to the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Medium Term Philippine Development Plan (MTPDP) for the promotion of Active Ageing in the Philippines.  In the Results Matrix of the PPASC provided to us by the DSWD, out of the 27 programs identified – 14 have been fully implemented; 10 were partially implemented; and 3 were not implemented. 

If We Had Been More Generous to our Senior Citizens!

Assuming that the PhP 500-subsidy was provided to our senior citizens on a monthly basis in 2003 and 2006, the effect to poverty among senior citizens would be19:

Poverty incidence among senior citizens would have been 1.1% only in 2003 instead of 15.1%; 2.4% only instead of 16.2% in 2006!  (Table 19)

In terms of magnitude, poor citizens would have been 56,947 only in 2003 instead of 793,233; 150,383 in 2006 instead of 1,035,089!  (Table 19)

And had we been even “more generous” and made this a PhP 1,000-monthly subsidy, there would have been no poor senior citizen in 2003 and 2006!  Ang saya saya sana di lang ni Lolo at Lola, but also the DSWD, National Anti-Poverty Commission (NAPC), among others!

But of course, subsidies would have its price. 

If the government provides this PhP 500- or PhP 1,000 monthly subsidy this year20, it translates to….

The responsibility of taking care of the lolos and lolas rests with all of us – the politicians, the government, the private sector, the immediate families, and the community.  To be able to provide and serve better our “young once”, concerned institutions should further improve their programs of support.  And just as importantly, we should share our information systems on senior citizens – with lower levels of disaggregation (e.g., geographic, by sex, etc.), towards evidence-based decision-making.

Also, both national and local governments can design new/innovative programs and projects that benefit our senior citizens.  Aside from the discounts and monthly pensions they receive, the government as well as the community may consider the following: 1) building parks catering to senior citizens to enjoy quality time together with their families, which is considered to be the most important source of happiness based on the PHI of the NSCB14; 2) setting up of libraries, where they can read their favorite romantic pocketbooks, among others; 3) creating play areas, where they can play mahjong, chess, or bridge with friends to save them from Alzheimer’s; 4) organizing monthly parties, where they can get to regularly meet and bond with their amigos and amigas as well as with their DIs; 5) organizing those who may be interested in participating in church services, etc.; 6) putting up day care centers and increasing nursing homes for senior citizens; and, 7) generating employment for seniors to keep their sense of productivity (e.g., senior citizens serving as activity coordinators, church facilitators, plants carers, etc.), among others.  But let us make sure that the benefits we design for our senior citizens only go to qualified beneficiaries.

In their younger years, many Lolos and Lolas worked hard to make sure that their children and grandchildren will have comfortable lives.  Now it is the turn of the children and grandchildren to return the favor.

 

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the author at ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph

 

_______________
1 Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) and Chairman of the Statistical Research and Training Center (SRTC). He holds a Ph. D. in Statistics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, U.S.A. and has taught mathematics and statistics at the University of the Philippines. He is also a past president of the Philippine Statistical Association. This article was co-written by Jessamyn O. Encarnacion and Ms. Anna Jean G. Casañas, OIC-Director and Statistical Coordination Officer I, respectively, of the NSCB. The authors thank Oliver Flores, Jenny Lobas, Gerald Junne L. Clariño, Cynthia S. Regalado, Jayne A. Monteza, Lourdes J. Hufana, Racquel Dolores V. Sabeñano, Noel S. Nepomuceno, Candido J. Astrologo, Jr., Ma. Libertie V. Masculino, Albert Garcia, Andrea Baylon, and Edgard E. Enrado for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB.

2 A term used in  the Tourism Satellite Accounts when defining a visitor. It refers to the geographical area (though not necessarily a contiguous one) within which an individual conducts his/her regular life routines.  (International Recommendations for Tourism Statistics 2008, UNWTO and UNSD)

3 For the period between 2000 and 2010, the Philippine population growth rate (PGR) is 2.02 based on the special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff using the 2000 Census-based Population Projections of the NSO. During the same period, the PGRs of Japan, US, Italy and France are 0.06%, 0.95%, 0.61%, and 0.62%, respectively, based on data from the United Nations Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Excel-Data/population.htm).

4 According to NSCB Board Resolution No. 5, Series of 2008, children are individuals who are below 18 years of age. (Source: http://www.nscb.gov.ph/glossary/terms/indicatorDetails.asp?strIndi=39331362)

5 Persons 60 years old and above as defined by Republic Act No. 9994 or The Expanded Senior Citizens Act of 2010. (Source:  http://www.lawphil.net/ statutes/repacts/ra2010/ra_9994_2010.html)

6 The latest available poverty statistics for eight basic sectors, including the senior citizens, are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) and the 2009 Labor Force Survey (LFS)) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).

7The authors also requested for data on pensions from the Social Security System (SSS) on 6 July 2011.  However, due to time constraint, the data could not be provided by the SSS by our deadline.

8 One of those who attended to us was Virginia Nival, who was very accommodating. May frontliners in government service be all like her!

9 This is affected by the deaths among pensioners and the entry of new pensioners.  The pensioners in 2009 were not necessarily the same pensioners in 2010.

10 Source:  Government Service Insurance System (GSIS).  (http://www.gsis.gov.ph/news.php?id=183)

11 From the composition “Laklak” by Siakol.

12 They have been anonymized but they are presently receiving their pensions from GSIS. Unfortunately, we do not have information on the original amounts of their pensions.

13 Depending on the area where they reside, i.e., Laguna for Lola Basyang and NCR for Professor X.

14 Virola, Romulo A. and Encarnacion, Pascasio, and Clavido. Measuring Progress of Philippine Society: What Makes the Poor Happy? 11th National Convention on Statistics. National Statistical Coordination Board. 4-5 October 2010. (http://www.nscb.gov.ph/ncs/11thNCS/papers/invited%20papers/ips23/01_Measuring%20Progress %20of%20Philippine%20Society%20What%20Makes%20the%20Poor%20Happy.pdf)
and
Virola, Romulo A. and Encarnacion, Jessamyn O. Measuring Progress of Societies: Gross National Product or Gross National Happiness? 10th National Convention on Statistics. National Statistical Coordination Board. 1-2 October 2007. (http://www.nscb.gov.ph/ncs/10thNCS/papers/invited%20papers/ips-28/ips28-03.pdf)

15 Source:  2005-2007 Philippine National Health Accounts compiled by the NSCB, as of 3 August 2010.  (http://www.nscb.gov.ph/stats/pnha/2007/distributionbysource.asp)

16 More details on the matter are available at the GSIS website:  http://www.gsis.gov.ph/news.php?id=208 and http://www.gsis.gov.ph/print.php?id=75.

17 Under this project, beneficiaries must be 70 years old and above, dependent or belonging to a family whose income is within or below the poverty threshold per area and not covered by the Government Service Insurance System (GSIS), Social Security System (SSS) or any private or government agency retirement benefits. (Source: http://www.dswd.gov.ph/index.php/archive/1760)

18 The Project initially targeted  one million indigent senior citizens.

19 This exercise was done for 2003 and 2006 only as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 FIES and the 2009 LFS) is not yet available from the NSO.  The subsidy was simply added to the computed per capita income of senior citizens.

20Still covering the months of January to December.

21 2011 GDP will only be available in January the following year.

22 Combined budget of the Department of Education (DepEd), Department of Health (DOH), and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) based on the General Appropriations Act, FY 2011of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM).

 

Figure 1. Average Age of the Total Population: 1980, 1990, 1995, 2000-2011, 2016, 2017, and 2040

cht1Sources:
1/ Based on the 1980, 1990 and 2000 Census of Population and Housing (CPH) and 1995 Census of Population of NSO.
2/ Special computations made by the NSCB-Technical Staff (NSCB-TS) using the 2000 Census-based Population Projections of NSO.

 

Table 1. Estimated Population, Philippines and the World:
1980, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2007, 2010-2020, and 2040

Year Estimated Total Population Ratio of World Population to Philippine Population
World 1/ Philippines 2/
1980      4,453,007,478          48,098,460 92.58
1990      5,306,425,154          60,559,116 87.62
1995      5,726,239,315          68,613,706 83.46
2000      6,122,770,220          76,504,077 80.03
2007      6,661,637,460          88,304,615 75.44
2010      6,895,889,018          94,013,200 73.35
2011      6,974,036,375          95,814,244 72.79
2012      7,052,135,305          97,609,976 72.25
2013      7,130,013,742          99,400,396 71.73
2014      7,207,459,699        101,185,504 71.23
2015      7,284,295,605        102,965,300 70.75
2016      7,360,430,365        104,739,784 70.27
2017      7,435,809,902        106,508,956 69.81
2018      7,510,341,273        108,272,816 69.36
2019      7,583,937,977        110,031,364 68.93
2020      7,656,527,984        111,784,600 68.49
2040      8,874,041,160        141,669,900 62.64

Sources:
1/ World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revisions, UN Population Division
2/ 1980, 1990, 1995, 2007, and 2010 figures are based on the Census of Population (and Housing) of the NSO during the reference year. Estimates for 2011-2020 and 2040 are based on special computations made by the NSCB-Technical Staff (NSCB-TS) using the 2000 Census-based Population Projections of the NSO.

 

Table 2. Estimated Total Number of Children by Single Age: 2011

Age Estimated Total Number % Share to Total Number of Children % Share to Total Population
0 2,324,664 6.2 2.4
1 2,261,056 6.0 2.4
2 2,209,328 5.9 2.3
3 2,164,848 5.8 2.3
4 2,124,648 5.7 2.2
5 2,227,482 5.9 2.3
6 2,155,456 5.7 2.2
7 2,093,373 5.6 2.2
8 2,037,595 5.4 2.1
9 1,985,818 5.3 2.1
10 2,161,770 5.7 2.3
11 2,056,216 5.5 2.1
12 1,968,864 5.2 2.1
13 1,893,788 5.0 2.0
14 1,826,282 4.9 1.9
15 2,203,051 5.9 2.3
16 2,020,289 5.4 2.1
17 1,887,247 5.0 2.0
       
0-17 37,601,776 100.0 39.2
All Ages 95,814,244    

Source: Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff using the 2000 Census-Based Population Projections of NSO.

Note: Per NSCB Resolution No. 5, Series of 2008, children are individuals " who are below 18 years of age. (Source: http://www.nscb.gov.ph/resolutions/2008/5AnnexA.asp)

 

Table 3. Estimated Total Number of Senior Citizens by Age Group and
Estimated Total Population:
1980, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2016, 2017, and 2040

Philippines Estimated Total Number % Share of SCs to Total Population
1980 1/ 1990 1/ 1995 1/ 2000 1/ 2007 1/ 2010 2/ 2011 2/ 2016 2/ 2017 2/ 2040 2/ 1980 1990 1995 2000 2007 2010 2011 2016 2017 2040
60 and over 2,541,837 3,187,967 3,736,622 4,565,560 5,498,848 6,367,100 6,628,656 8,189,516 8,552,304 19,612,300 5.3 5.3 5.4 6.0 6.2 6.8 6.9 7.8 8.0 13.8
60-64 905,496 1,127,881   1,322,007   1,633,150    1,834,627   2,307,800 2,404,612      2,966,432 3,094,348 6,032,600 1.9 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.1 2.5 2.5 2.8 2.9 4.3
65-69 718,336       807,620       955,854   1,138,843    1,416,423 1,559,300 1,658,796      2,154,956 2,253,924 4,742,800 1.5 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.7 2.1 2.1 3.3
70-74 440,304       565,339       654,440      797,970    1,020,530 1,189,400 1,187,372      1,366,892 1,440,728 3,748,300 0.9 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.2 1.3 1.4 2.6
75-79 283,810 687,127       410,001      505,356       621,941 700,500 749,440        932,640 956,980 2,612,100 0.6 1.1 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.9 0.9 1.8
80+ 193,891       394,320      490,241       605,327 610,100 628,436        768,596 806,324 2,476,500 0.4 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.8 1.7
Estimated Total Population 48,098,460 60,559,116 68,613,706 76,504,077  88,304,615 94,013,200 95,814,244 104,739,784  106,508,956  141,669,900                    

Sources:
1/ Based on the 1980, 1990 and 2000 Census of Population and Housing (CPH) and 1995 and 2007 Census of Population (PopCen) of NSO
2/ Special computations made by the NSCB-Technical Staff (NSCB-TS) using the Population Projections of NSO.

Note: a/ Data on the 1990 total population by single age year is not readily available. Hence, total household population (i.e., excluding institutional population) is used instead.

 

Table 4a. Projected Additions to Life Expectancy At Birth Every Year, by Sex, Philippines: 2000-2040
(Medium Assumption)1/

MALE

  2000-2005 2005-2010 2010-2015 2015-2020 2020-2025 2025-2030 2030-2035 2035-2040
Male 2/ 64.11 66.11 67.61 68.81 70.01 71.01 72.01 73.01
Difference between the five-year interval 3/ in years 2.00 1.50 1.20 1.20 1.00 1.00 1.00
in months 24.00 18.00 14.40 14.40 12.00 12.00 12.00
Average months added to life expectancy every year 3/   4.8 3.6 2.9 2.9 2.4 2.4 2.4

FEMALE

  2000-2005 2005-2010 2010-2015 2015-2020 2020-2025 2025-2030 2030-2035 2035-2040
Female 2/ 70.14 71.64 73.14 74.34 75.54 76.54 77.54 78.34
Difference between the five-year interval 3/ in years 1.50 1.50 1.20 1.20 1.00 1.00 0.80
in months 18.00 18.00 14.40 14.40 12.00 12.00 9.60
Average months added to life expectancy every year 3/   3.6 3.6 2.9 2.9 2.4 2.4 1.9

Sources:
1/ Medium assumption/series assumes a moderate pace of fertility decline. (http://www.census.gov.ph/data/technotes/notepp00.pdf)
2/ National Statistics Office, 2000 Census-based Population Projections
3/ Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff

 

Table 4b. Life Expectancy at birth, by Sex, Philippines: 2010-2020

Philippines 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Male
66.75 67.05 67.33 67.61 67.87 68.13 68.37 68.59 68.81 69.01 69.21
Female
72.82 72.58 72.86 73.14 73.4 73.66 73.9 74.12 74.34 74.54 74.74

Source: Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff using 2000 Census-based Life Expectancy at birth of the NSO.

 

Table 5. Projected Population and Percent Share of Senior Citizens,
by Region and Sex: 2010 (Medium Assumption)

Region Projected Population of Senior Citizens Projected Population Proportion of Senior Citizens to Population Percent Share (%) Percent Share (%) to Total Phil. Population
Women Men Total Women Men Total
Philippines  3,437,100 2,930,000 6,367,100 94,013,200  6.8 100.0   100.0 100.0 6.8
                   
NCR  415,600 342,000 757,600 11,552,100 6.6 12.1 11.7 11.9 0.8
CAR 58,500  50,600  109,100 1,694,400 6.4 1.7 1.7 1.7 0.1
Region I 239,100 188,100 427,200 2,573,900 16.6 7.0 6.4 6.7 0.5
Region II  123,900 109,200 233,100 3,365,400 6.9 3.6 3.7 3.7 0.2
Region III 396,500 324,900 721,400 10,159,300 7.1 11.5 11.1 11.3 0.8
Region IVA 431,200  347,500 778,700 11,904,100 6.5 12.5 11.9 12.2 0.8
Region IVB 95,300 87,800 183,100 3,018,000 6.1 2.8 3.0 2.9 0.2
Region V 220,700 190,200 410,900 5,711,500 7.2 6.4  6.5 6.5 0.4
Region VI 334,200 266,700 600,900 7,578,000 7.9 9.7 9.1 9.4 0.6
Region VII 290,300 238,900 529,200 7,029,300 7.5 8.4 8.2 8.3 0.6
Region VIII 181,500 156,200 337,700 4,447,500 7.6 5.3 5.3 5.3 0.4
Region IX 95,300 91,700 187,000 3,487,400 5.4 2.8 3.1 2.9 0.2
Region X 139,100 128,300 267,400 4,349,300 6.1 4.0 4.4 4.2 0.3
Region XI 139,500 136,500 276,000 4,362,400 6.3 4.1 4.7 4.3 0.3
Region XII 111,000 108,100 219,100 4,080,400 5.4 3.2 3.7 3.4 0.2
ARMM 77,600 82,500 160,100 3,551,800 4.5 2.3 2.8 2.5 0.2
Caraga 87,800  80,800 168,600 2,549,400 6.6 2.6 2.8 2.6 0.2

Source: National Statistics Office, 2000 Census-based Population Projections 
in collaboration with the Interagency Working Group on Population Projections

 

Table 6. Projected Population and Percent Share of Senior Citizens,
by Sex and Age Group: 2010 (Medium Assumption)

Age Projected Population of Senior Citizens Percent Share across Total (%) Percent Share across Women/Men(%)
Women Men Total Women Men Total Women Men Total
60 and over  3,437,100 2,930,000   6,367,100 54.0 46.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
60-64 1,185,000  1,122,800 2,307,800 51.3 48.7 100.0 34.5 38.3 36.2
65-69 823,600 735,700 1,559,300 52.8 47.2 100.0 24.0 25.1 24.5
70-74 655,700  533,700 1,189,400 55.1 44.9 100.0 19.1 18.2 18.7
75-79 402,000 298,500 700,500 57.4 42.6 100.0 11.7 10.2 11.0
80+ 370,800 239,300 610,100 60.8 39.2 100.0 10.8 8.2 9.6

Source: National Statistics Office, 2000 Census-based Population Projections in collaboration with the Interagency Working Group on Population Projections

 

Table 7. Survival Age by Sex: 2000 and 2011

Age in 2000 Number of survivors at age x, l(x) Survival age Age in 2011 Number of years expected to live after 2011
Male Female Male Female Male Female
50       80,129       86,564 82 84 61 21 23
55       76,033       83,751 83 84 66 17 18
60       70,304       79,900 83 84 71 12 13
65       62,770       74,311 84 85 76 8 9
70       53,337       67,014 84 85 81 3 4
75       42,201       56,012 85 86      
80       29,934       41,620 87 87      
85       17,915       25,143 89 89      
90         8,184       12,382 92 92      
95         2,527         4,335          

Source: Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff using the
2000 Life Tables of Dr. Josefina Cabigon.

 

Table 8. Number of Marriages by Age Group of Bride and Groom Aged 60 and Over and by Sex: Philippines, 2006 - 2008

  Number Percent Share
Bride Groom Bride Groom
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
All population 582,281 518,595 492,666 490,050 486,514 582,281 518,595 492,666 490,054 486,514                    
                                         
60 and over 2,373 2,034 1,922 1,718  1,546 6,933 6,424 6,120 5,756 5,406 0.41 0.39 0.39 0.35 0.32 1.19 1.24 1.24 1.17 1.11
60 - 64 1,232 1,011  941 932  809 3,180 2,873 2,796 2,733 2,580 0.21 0.19 0.19 0.19 0.17 0.55 0.55 0.57 0.56 0.53
65 - 69 629 581 522 459 379 1,696 1,647 1,582 1,496 1,392 0.11 0.11 0.11 0.09 0.08 0.29 0.32 0.32 0.31 0.29
70 - 74 279 251 256 186 210 979 883 847  745 713 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.04 0.17 0.17 0.17 0.15 0.15
75 and Over 233 191 203 141 148 1,078 1,021 895  782 721 0.04 0.04 0.04 0.03 0.03 0.19 0.20 0.18 0.16 0.15

Source: National Statistics Office

 

Table 9. Poverty Incidence for the Basic Sectors: 2003 and 2006 1/

Sector Poverty Incidence 2/ Difference
2003 2006 2003 - 2006
Philippines  24.9 26.4 1.5
       
Fishermen 35.0 41.4 6.4
Farmers 37.0 37.2 0.2
Children 32.7 34.8 2.1
Women 24.0 25.1 1.1
Youth 19.0 20.8 1.8
Senior Citizens 15.1 16.2 1.2
Migrant and Formal Sector  14.6 15.7 1.1
Urban 11.1 12.5 1.4

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

Notes:
1/ Poverty statistics among senior citizens are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the 2009 Labor Force Survey) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).
2/ The poverty estimates are based on the refined official poverty estimation methodology, which was approved by the NSCB Executive Board during its 1st Quarter Meeting on 1 February 2011.

 

Table 10. Poverty Incidence among Senior Citizens, by Region: 2003, and 2006 1/

Region Poverty Incidence 2/ Difference
2003 2006 2003 - 2006
Philippines  15.1 16.2 1.2
       
NCR 1.0 1.9 1.0
CAR 12.3 16.1 3.8
Region I 9.9 14.1 4.2
Region II 8.9 9.4 0.5
Region III 6.9 7.7 0.7
Region IVA 7.5 6.4 (1.1)
Region IVB 22.1 20.1 (2.0)
Region V 23.8 24.7 0.9
Region VI 14.0 14.4 0.3
Region VII 27.5 29.5 2.0
Region VIII 20.3 24.3 4.0
Region IX 35.5 31.0 (4.5)
Region X 24.0 25.5 1.5
Region XI 20.5 20.8 0.3
Region XII 20.7 22.0 1.3
ARMM 18.5 34.3 15.9
Caraga 28.0 28.8 0.8

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

Notes:
1/ Poverty statistics among senior citizens are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the 2009 Labor Force Survey) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).
2/ The poverty estimates are based on the refined official poverty estimation methodology, which was approved by the NSCB Executive Board during its 1st Quarter Meeting on 1 February 2011.

 

Table 11. Magnitude of Poor Population among Basic Sectors: 2003 and 2006 1/

Sector Magnitude of Poor Population 2/ Difference between 2003-2006 Share to Total Poor
2003 2006 Number Percent 2003 2006
Philippines 3/  19,796,954 22,173,190 2,376,236 12.0    
             
Children 11,400,000 12,300,000 900,000   7.9 57.6 55.5
Women 9,605,037 10,700,000 1,094,963  11.4 48.5 48.3
Urban 4,429,424 5,310,531 881,107 19.9 22.4 24.0
Youth 4,280,197 4,850,607 570,410 13.3 21.6 21.9
Migrant and Formal Sector  2,283,773 2,599,336 315,563 13.8 11.5 11.7
Farmers 1,768,249 1,773,484 5,235  0.3 8.9 8.0
Senior Citizens 793,233 1,035,089 241,856  30.5 4.0 4.7
Fishermen 355,815 400,214 44,398 12.5 1.8 1.8

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

Notes:
1/ Poverty statistics among senior citizens are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the 2009 Labor Force Survey) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).
2/ The poverty estimates are based on the refined official poverty estimation methodology, which was approved by the NSCB Executive Board during its 1st Quarter Meeting on 1 February 2011. 3/ Magnitude of poor population and share to total poor across basic sectors do not add up to total Philippines as the former are not mutually exclusive across sectors.

Table 12. Magnitude of Poor Senior Citizens, by Region: 2003 and 2006 1/

Region Magnitude of Poor SCs 2/ Difference between 2003-2006 Share to Total Poor SCs
2003 2006 Number Percent 2003 2006
Philippines 793,233 1,035,089 241,856 30.5 100.0 100.0
             
NCR 5,850 14,219 8,370 143.1 0.7 1.4
CAR 12,257 18,320 6,063 49.5 1.5 1.8
Region I 33,753 62,694 28,941 85.7 4.3 6.1
Region II 18,908 19,737 829 4.4 2.4 1.9
Region III 39,965 55,017 15,052 37.7 5.0 5.3
Region IVA 46,259 46,924 665 1.4 5.8 4.5
Region IVB 32,343 37,117 4,774 14.8 4.1 3.6
Region V 83,792 105,220 21,427 25.6 10.6 10.2
Region VI 71,484 86,502 15,018 21.0 9.0 8.4
Region VII 128,599 169,019 40,420 31.4 16.2 16.3
Region VIII 59,842 92,819 32,978 55.1 7.5 9.0
Region IX 66,143 68,968 2,825 4.3 8.3 6.7
Region X 52,680 71,831 19,151 36.4 6.6 6.9
Region XI 48,472 55,805 7,333 15.1 6.1 5.4
Region XII 35,952 46,842 10,890 30.3 4.5 4.5
ARMM 16,348 37,534 21,186 129.6 2.1 3.6
Caraga 40,587 46,519 5,933 14.6 5.1 4.5

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

Notes:
1/ Poverty statistics among senior citizens are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the 2009 Labor Force Survey) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).
2/ The poverty estimates are based on the refined official poverty estimation methodology, which was approved by the NSCB Executive Board during its 1st Quarter Meeting on 1 February 2011.

Table 13. Distribution of Regular Pensioners (Old Age and Disability)
by Attained Age, Sex and Total Basic Monthly Pension (BMP)

Attained Age Regular Pensioner Share to Total Number
of Regular Pensioner
Regular Pensioners
Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total
Number Ave. BMP Number Ave. BMP Number Ave. BMP Number Ave. BMP Number Ave. BMP Number Ave. BMP
as of December 31, 2008
60 and over 79,014 7,280 101,076 8,150 180,090  7,768 43.9 56.1 100            
60-64 6,799 9,567 10,132 10,132 16,931  9,905 40.2 59.8 100            
65-69 21,303 8,127 27,691 10,328 48,994  9,371 43.5 56.5 100            
70-74 22,550 7,995 23,870 9,476 46,420   8,757 48.6 51.4 100            
75-79 13,416 5,950 17,719 5,884 31,135 5,913 43.1 56.9 100            
80-84 9,078  5,277 13,564  4,965 22,642   5,090 40.1 59.9 100            
85-89 4,355 5,031 5,993 4,741 10,348   4,863 42.1 57.9 100            
90 and above 1,513 4,678 2,107   4,225 3,620  4,414 41.8 58.2 100            
as of December 31, 2009 1/ Percent Increase/Decrease between 2008-2009
60 and over 80,359 7,784 108,633 8,785 188,993   8,359 42.5 57.5 100.0 1.7 6.9 7.5 7.8 4.9 7.6
60-64 7,774 10,087 11,008 10,418 18,782 10,281 41.4 58.6 100.0 14.3 5.4 8.6 2.8 10.9 3.8
65-69 22,635 8,470 32,677 10,661 55,313   9,764 40.9 59.1 100.0 6.3 4.2 18.0 3.2 12.9 4.2
70-74 23,898 8,544 27,601 10,192 51,499   9,427 46.4 53.6 100.0 6.0 6.9 15.6 7.6 10.9 7.7
75-79 12,437   6,344 15,790 6,452 28,227   6,405 44.1 55.9 100.0 (7.3) 6.6 (10.9) 9.7 (9.3) 8.3
80-84 8,304 5,519 13,390 5,184 21,694   5,312 38.3 61.7 100.0 (8.5) 4.6 (1.3) 4.4 (4.2) 4.4
85-89 3,969 5,052 6,156 4,851 10,125    4,930 39.2 60.8 100.0 (8.9) 0.4 2.7 2.3 (2.2) 1.4
90 and above 1,342 4,798 2,011  4,386 3,353   4,551 40.0 60.0 100.0 (11.3) 2.6 (4.6) 3.8 (7.4) 3.1
as of December 31, 2010 Percent Increase/Decrease between 2009-2010
60 and over 82,998 7,964 116,581 9,029 199,579 8,586 41.6 58.4 100.0 3.3 2.3 7.3 2.8 5.6 2.7
60-64 7,727 10,693 10,874 10,781 18,601 10,744 41.5 58.5 100.0 (0.6) 6.0 (1.2) 3.5 (1.0) 4.5
65-69 21,379 8,419 33,733 10,705 55,112   9,818 38.8 61.2 100.0 (5.5) (0.6) 3.2 0.4 (0.4) 0.6
70-74 26,302 8,774 32,404 10,527 58,706   9,742 44.8 55.2 100.0 10.1 2.7 17.4 3.3 14.0 3.3
75-79 13,080 6,817 15,519 7,169 28,599   7,008 45.7 54.3 100.0 5.2 7.5 (1.7) 11.1 1.3 9.4
80-84 8,720 5,694 14,519   5,275 23,239  5,432 37.5 62.5 100.0 5.0 3.2 8.4 1.8 7.1 2.3
85-89 4,224  5,011 7,025 4,856 11,249   4,914 37.6 62.4 100.0 6.4 (0.8) 14.1 0.1 11.1 (0.3)
90 and above 1,566 4,873 2,507 4,463 4,073 4,621 38.4 61.6 100.0 16.7 1.6 24.7 1.8 21.5 1.5

Source: Information Technology Services Group of GSIS

Note: 1/ Number of pensioners by sex does not add up to total as one pensioner belonging to the age group 65-69 has no sex indicated in the GSIS database.

 

Table 14. Comparison of the Average Pension and the Monthly Minimum Wage
by Region: 2008-2010

Philippines

Amount in Pesos (PhP) Ratio of Average Pension to Monthly Minimum Wage 
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
Average Pension
(60 and over) 1/
      7,768       8,359        8,586      
Monthly Minimum Wage 2/
NCR       9,672       9,932       10,218 0.80 0.84 0.84
CAR       6,578       6,760        6,760 1.18 1.24 1.27
Region I       6,110       6,240        6,240 1.27 1.34 1.38
Region II       5,954       6,110        6,110 1.30 1.37 1.41
Region III       7,670       7,852        7,878 1.01 1.06 1.09
Region IVA       8,112       8,320        8,320 0.96 1.00 1.03
Region IVB       6,370       6,552        6,604 1.22 1.28 1.30
Region V       6,058       6,214        6,240 1.28 1.35 1.38
Region VI       6,318       6,500        6,656 1.23 1.29 1.29
Region VII       6,734       6,942        7,098 1.15 1.20 1.21
Region VIII       6,058       6,188        6,188 1.28 1.35 1.39
Region IX       6,058       6,240        6,370 1.28 1.34 1.35
Region X       6,526       6,656        6,734 1.19 1.26 1.28
Region XI       6,682       6,890        7,072 1.16 1.21 1.21
Region XII       6,162       6,370        6,422 1.26 1.31 1.34
ARMM       5,330       5,460        5,564 1.46 1.53 1.54
Caraga       5,902       6,058        6,136 1.32 1.38 1.40

Sources:
1/ Information Technology Services Group (ITSG) of GSIS
2/ The minimum wage used is the wage of the non-agricultural sector, which was multiplied by 26 days to come up with the monthly minimum wage. National Wages and Productivity Commission (NWPC)

 

Table 15. Consumer Price Index for All Income Households in the Philippines,
for All Items and Selected Commodity Items: 2008-2010
(2000=100)

Major Commodity Item Index Inflation Bottom 30% Income Households
2008 2009 2010 2008-2009 2009-2010
All Items 155.0 160.0 166.1 3.2 3.8 3.6
             
Food, Beverages and Tobacco (FBT) 152.3 161.2 166.1 5.8 3.0 3.5
Clothing 130.1 133.4 136.0 2.5 1.9 2.1
Fuel, Light and Water (FLW) 193.9 188.8 214.0 (2.6) 13.3 8.7
Services 180.5 180.1 188.0 (0.2) 4.4 2.1

Source: National Statistics Office

 

Table 16. The Case of Lola Basyang

The following information are available:

1.1 She is 84 years old.
1.2. She retired in July 1990 with the position Teacher III upon retirement.
1.3. She served the government for 30 years.
1.4. To date, her monthly pension is PhP 5,069.

Indicators Code Amount in Pesos (PhP)
1990 1992 2009 2011
Annual Per Capita Poverty Threshold (Laguna) 1/ A1       5,031 6,517 17,295       18,724
Monthy Per Capita Poverty Threshold (Laguna) B1 419         543  1,441         1,560
Pension/month 2/ C1      5,000         5,069
Monthly Salary of Teacher III 3/ D1          15,119 18,333
Ratios
C1/B1     -          3.47          3.25
C1/D1       0.33 0.28

Sources:
1/ Estimates for 1990, 1992 and 2011 are special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff (NSCB-TS) using CPI for all items (2000=100) of NSO. The 2009 estimate is based on the 2009 Official Poverty Statistics of NSCB released on 8 February 2011.

2/ Based on information from GSIS. 

3/ Based on National Budget Circular (NBC) No. 521 for 2009 and NBC No. 530, Department of Budget and Management (DBM) for 2011.

 

Table 17. The Case of Professor X

The following information are available:

2.1. She retired from service effective June 1987.
2.2 She retired as Full Professor then, with a basic salary of PhP 100,992 per annum. As of today, the salary of a Full Professor is equal to SG 28, step 7 or PhP 62,752 per month or PhP 753,024 per annum.
2.3. She taught for almost 42 years - from July 1946 to May1987.
2.4. To date, her monthly pension is PhP 14,762.

Indicators Code Amount in Pesos (PhP)
1987 2009 2011
Annual Per Capita Poverty Threshold
(NCR) a/
A2       3,673     19,802       21,342
Monthy Per Capita Poverty Threshold
(NCR)
B2         306       1,650         1,778
Pension/month b/ C2       14,366       14,762
Monthly Salary of Full Professor c/ D2       8,416     43,705 62,752
Ratios
C2/B2   -        8.71          8.30
C2/D2   -        0.33          0.24

Sources:
a/ Estimates for 1987 and 2011 are special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff (NSCB-TS) using CPI for all items (2000=100) of NSO. The 2009 estimate is based on the 2009 Official Poverty Statistics of NSCB released on 8 February 2011.
b/ Based on information from GSIS.
c/ For 1987, based on information from UP Diliman-Institute of Mathematics. For 2009 and 2011, based on National Budget Circular (NBC) No. 521 and NBC No. 530, respectively, Department of Budget and Management (DBM).

 

Table 18A. Top 5 Leading Causes of Death for Population 60-64 years old: 2005

Cause 60-64 years old
Number Rate*
Cerebrovascular disease      5,009 283.7
Acute myocardial infarction      3,011 170.5
Tuberculosis of the respiratory system      2,706 153.2
Diabetes milletus      2,553 144.6
Chronic lower respiratory diseases      2,143 121.4

Note: * Rate is per 100,000 population of corresponding age group.
Source: 2005 Philippine Health Statistics (PHS), Department of Health (DOH)

 

Table 18B. Top 5 Leading Causes of Death for Population 65-69 years old: 2005

Cause 65-69 years old
Number Rate*
Cerebrovascular disease      5,760 400.9
Acute myocardial infarction      3,327 231.6
Tuberculosis of the respiratory system      3,108 216.3
Chronic lower respiratory diseases      2,993 208.3
Diabetes milletus      2,706 188.3

Note: * Rate is per 100,000 population of corresponding age group.
Source: 2005 Philippine Health Statistics (PHS), Department of Health (DOH)

 

Table 18C. Top 5 Leading Causes of Death for Population 70 years old and over: 2005

Cause 70 years and over
Number Rate*
Pneumonia     22,590 1,099.3
Cerebrovascular disease     19,103 929.6
Ill-defined and unknown causes of mortality     14,218 691.9
Acute myocardial infarction     11,082 539.3
Chronic lower respiratory diseases     10,022 487.7

Note: * Rate is per 100,000 population of corresponding age group.
Source: 2005 Philippine Health Statistics (PHS), Department of Health (DOH)

 

Table 19. Poverty among Senior Citizens Without and With PhP500- and PhP 1000-subsidy: 2003 and 2006 1/

Philippines Among Senior Citizens2/ Difference
Without Subsidy With PhP 500-subsidy 3/ With PhP 1000-subsidy3/ 2003 2006
2003 2006 2003 2006 2003 2006 C-A E-A D-B F-B
A B C D E F
Poverty incidence 15.1 16.2 1.1 2.4 0.0 0.0 (14.0) (15.1) (13.8) (16.2)
Magnitude of poor  793,233 1,035,089  56,947 150,383       -      -   (736,286) (793,233) (884,706) (1,035,089)

Source: Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff.

Notes:
1/ Poverty statistics among senior citizens are still for 2006 as the necessary data file (i.e., merged datafile of the 2009 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and the 2009 Labor Force Survey) is not yet available from the National Statistics Office (NSO).
2/ The poverty estimates are based on the refined official poverty estimation methodology, which was approved by the NSCB Executive Board during its 1st Quarter Meeting on 1 February 2011.
3/ The PhP 500- and PhP1000-subsidy to the senior citizens were simply added to the computed monthly per capita income of the senior citizens from the 2003 and 2006 Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) of NSO.

 

Table 20A. Total Amount of the PhP500- and PhP1000-subsidy to Senior Citizens (SCs), GDP and Government Budget

  Number
Estimated Total Number of SCs (2011) 1/                  6,628,656
   Amount
(In thousand Pesos) 
PhP 500-subsidy 2/                  3,314,328
Php 1,000-subsidy 2/                  6,628,656
2010 GDP
(At Current Prices) 3/
           9,003,480,000
2011 Government Budget 4/            1,000,387,764
2011 Government Budget on Social Services 5/              258,062,476

Notes:
1/ Special Computations made by the NSCB-Technical Staff using the Population Projections of NSO.
2/ Multiplied with the projected number of senior citizens for 2011. Special computations made by the NSCB-TS.
3/ Philippine System of National Accounts (PSNA), NSCB (as of May 2011)
4/ General Appropriations Act (GAA), FY 2011, Department of Budget and Management
5/ Combined budget of the Department of Education (DepEd), Department of Health (DOH), and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) based on the General Appropriations Act, FY 2011 of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM).

 

Table 20B. Percentage Share of the PhP 500- and PhP 1000-subsidy of Senior Citizens to GDP and Government Budget

  As a percentage of
2010 GDP
(At Current Prices) a/
2011 Government Budget b/ 2011 Government Budget on social services c/
PhP 500-subsidy 0.04 0.33 1.28
PhP 1,000-subsidy 0.07 0.66 2.57

Source: Special computations made by the NSCB Technical Staff using data from the following:
a/ Philippine System of National Accounts (PSNA), NSCB (as of May 2011)
b/ General Appropriations Act (GAA), FY 2011 of the Department of Budget and Management (DBM).
c/ Combined budget of the DepEd, DOH, and DSWD based on the GAA FY 2011 of the DBM.

 

Posted: 11 July 2011.

 

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