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Headlines Statistically Speaking

Land Transport in the Philippines: Retrogressing Towards Motorcycles?
by Dr. Romulo A. Virola 1
Secretary General, NSCB

Transportation plays a vital role in the development of a country’s economy. We need it to go to work and goods and services will not be able to reach consumers unless they pass through channels of transportation, be it by land, water or air. It contributes to employment generation and it has a crucial role in tourism, since it links people traveling to different destinations. In terms of gross value added (GVA), in 2008, transportation had a share of 3.1 percent of our country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP)2 bigger than the share of mining and quarrying (1.7%) and only slightly lower than the share of utilities (electricity, gas and water, 3.2%). In 1998, tourism consumption expenditures on passenger transport services expanded to P8.574 billion from P4.103 billion in 19943. This represents 4.8 percent of total tourism consumption expenditures in 1998. In 2006, land transportation employment reached 36,576 and revenue of establishments engaged in land transportation was estimated at P25.152 billion4.

At present, the most widely used mode of transportation in the Philippines is land. It contributes more than five times the combined GVA of water and air transportation with a 2.6 percent share to GDP in 2008. But while countries like China and Vietnam are replacing their bicycles and motorbikes with cars, we in the Philippines are taking the opposite route. Have you ever ridden the habal habal5?

Let us examine the latest available statistics on land transportation.

Metro Manila, the center of Philippine socio-economic and political activities, has been plagued by pollution and heavy traffic due to increasing volume of vehicles and commuters. With the establishment of railway systems such as the Metro Rail Transit (Metrostar/MRT3), Light Rail Transit (LRT1) and the Megatren (LRT2), there is less traffic congestion, reduction in air pollution, and considerable savings in traveling time, thus, greater economic benefits. Table 1 shows some statistics on their operations from January 2004 until July 2009.

  Now, let us look at the status of our roads…

In general, our national roads are improving in quality10 from only 23.5 percent concrete roads in 1986 to 45.8 percent in 2008 (Table 2 and Figure 1).

At the regional level (Table 3 and Figure 2), as of November 2008,

Region VIII (Eastern Visayas) had the highest percentage of concrete roads at 66.1 percent;

Region IV-B (MIMAROPA) had the lowest percentage at 34.0 percent

Among the 16 regions being observed by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), aside from MIMAROPA, there were nine other regions below the national percentage of concrete roads: CAR, CALABARZON, Regions X, XII, VI, V, XI, VII and Caraga.

In terms of length of national roads per 100,000 population (Table 3),

Region IV-B (MIMAROPA) had the highest ratio at 77.6 kilometers; followed by National Capital Region (NCR) at 66.8 kilometers;

Cordillera Autonomous Region (CAR) had the lowest ratio at 16.4 kilometers.

Looking at the national bridges as of 31 December 2008 (Tables 4 and 5)…

In a span of more than 20 years from 1986 to 2008, the number of bridges increased from 7,379 to 7,758 or by 5.1 percent. In meters, the total length of our bridges increased from about 230,200 to 327, 700 or by 42.3 percent.

NCR has the longest  length of national bridges at 1,919 linear meters per 100,000 population, which is more than five times  the national ratio of 376 linear meters per 100,000 population. Thus, we have about two meters of bridge for every 100 Metro Manilans.

CAR has the shortest at 97.2 linear meters per 100,000 population;

In addition to having the best road quality, Region VIII (Eastern Visayas)  also has the most number of national bridges (with 11.7 percent share to total number of bridges)

Region IX (Zamboanga Peninsula) has the fewest number of bridges (at 3.0 percent share);

Interms of strength11, NCR has the strongest bridges with 100 percent of its national bridges being permanent;

Caraga has the most number of weak bridges (with only 65.8 percent of its national bridges being permanent) while MIMAROPA has the longest length of weak bridges (with only 83.0 percent of the total length of its bridges being permanent).

And which of the past four administrations, one may ask, invested the most in land transport infrastructure?  (Table 6),

Permanent national roads expanded the most, overall, during the Ramos administration by 28.2 percent, but on an annualized basis this happened during the Estrada administration by 6.8%.

Least expansion of permanent national roads overall occurred during the Aquino administration (growth of 17.7%) but on an annualized basis, during the Arroyo administration at 2.6 percent. However, if we only consider the years 2003-200812 for Arroyo administration,least expansion of permanent national roads will be during her administration at 14.9 percent, but on an annualized basis, it will be during Aquino administration at 2.7 percent.

National bridges lengthened the most during the Arroyo administration both overall at 11.1% and on an annualized basis at 2.1 percent.

Lowest expansion occurred during the Estrada administration at 6.1 percent and on an annualized basis during the Ramos administration at 1.1 %.

Now, let us look at some statistics on  the users of our roads and bridges - the motor vehicles and their drivers -  and their violations.

From 2000 to 2008, motor vehicle (MV) registration increased by 6.0 per cent annually, outpacing  the population growth of  2.0 percent. (Tables 7, 8 and 9).

Now for the violations and the violators (Tables 13, 14, 15).

Table 13 shows the five most expensive traffic violations to commit. Common traffic violations are actually “cheaper” to commit.. But don’t even try to operate a right-hand drive motor vehicle unless you are ready to shell out P50,000 once apprehended. If you are not authorized, then do not install or use a bell, siren or exhaust whistle (the same that is being used on an ambulance, fire trucks and police cars) or you will be fined  P15,000 and forfeit the illegal gadget. And so on.

The top 9 violations common to all years from 2004 to 2008 increased by 9.8% in 2008.

From 2005 to 2008, the ratio of apprehensions to total number of driver’s licenses issued averaged about 22 per cent.

Committing violations is of course one cause of transportation accidents (Tables 16 and 17).

Would you believe that on the average, only 0.2 percent of the total registered MV suffer damages due to traffic accidents?

But you would probably not be surprised  that traffic accidents far outnumber maritime and air accidents, with a share  of over 95 percent.

Ondoy and Pepeng which hit the country the past two weeks, caused damages to roads, bridges and other structures estimated at P2.539 billion and P281.67 million, respectively. Regions most affected by Ondoy were Region III (Central Luzon) with estimated damages to roads and bridges of P1.423 billion, followed by Region IV–A (CALABARZON) with estimated damages of P784 million and Region V (Bicol) with damages of P96 million. Pepeng on the other hand affected regions CAR (with estimated damages to roads and bridges of P179 million, Bicol (with estimated damages of P56 million) and Region I (Ilocos Region with estimated damages of P46 million)14 . With more than two months left before the year ends, we don’t know how many more tropical storms, typhoon or other calamity might hit us. Let us  hope and pray that calamities like Ondoy and Pepeng won’t happen again. But we have to learn to prepare for such disasters. All of us!

Meanwhile,  let us celebrate the National Statistics Month with the theme “ Enhancing Security Sector Statistics For Good Governance, Peace, and Sustainable Development” or “Pagpapahusay ng Estadistika sa Sektor ng  Panseguridad para sa Mabuting Pamamahala, Kapayapaan at Maipagpapatuloy na Pagpapaunlad”.

 

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the author at ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph.

________________

1 Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) and Chairman of the Statistical Research and Training Center (SRTC). He holds a Ph. D. in Statistics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, USA and has taught mathematics and statistics at the University of the Philippines. He is also a past president of the Philippine Statistical Association.  This article is co-written by Rhea-Ann A. Bautista, Statistical Coordination Officer IV of the Production Accounts Division, Economic  Statistics Office, NSCB. The authors thank Mai Lin C. Villaruel,  Marymell C. Martillan, Eunice Tambasen, Edwin U. Aragon, Noel S. Nepomuceno, Albert A. Garcia, Jessamyn O. Encarnacion, Candido J. Astrologo, Jr., and Ma. Libertie V. Masculino of the NSCB for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB.

2 National Statistical Coordination Board. 2009. National Accounts of the Philippines. CY 2006 to 2008 (Base Year: 1985). Makati City.

3 Virola, Romulo A, Mariel M. Remulla, Lea H. Amoro and Milagros Y. Say. 2001. Measuring the Contribution of Tourism to the Economy: The Philippine Tourism Satellite Account. Presented on the 8th National Convention on Statistics, Manila, organized by the Philippine Statistical System thru the National Statistical Coordination Board, 1-2 October 2001.

4 National Statistics Office. 2006 Census of Philippine Business and Industry. Transport, Storage and Communications for Establishments with Average Total Employment of 20 and Over. http://www.census.gov.ph/data/sectordata/databusind.html. Date accessed: October 8, 2009.

5 The Habal-Habal is a motorcycle modified to seat more than two persons. It is in use in provinces in the Philippines where jeepneys and tricycles cannot stand the rough, steep terrain and narrow roads, such as the mountains of Mindanao. It is also called the "Skylab". According to some sources, this name is either taken from the space station, or a contraction of the phrase "sakay na, lab (get on, love)!".
(Source: http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php?title=Habal-Habal )

6 Metro Rail Transit Corporation. About MRT. http://www.dotcmrt3.gov.ph/about_mrt3. Date accessed: October 9, 2009.

7 Load factor (LF) is the ratio between the actual passenger kilometer and the available passenger kilometer, or  the ratio of the distance traveled by all passengers to the total distance traveled when carrying the maximum number of passengers.

8 Light Rail Transport Authority. Railway Operations LRT Line 1 System. http://www.lrta.gov.ph/line1_metrorail.htm. Date accessed: July 28, 2009.

9Light Rail Transport Authority. Railway Operations MRT Line 2 System. http://www.lrta.gov.ph/line2_megatren.htm. Date accessed: July 28, 2009

10 Quality is defined in terms of surface type, with concrete assumed to be the best compared to asphalt, gravel, and earth.

11 Strength is defined in terms of type with permanent ( Concrete or Steel) assumed to be stronger than temporary (Bailey or Timber)

12 In 2003, a new system was adopted (called Road and Bridge Information Application - RBIA) which uses satellite imaging and aims to provide more accurate measurement of roads.

13 Statistically Speaking article on Pinoy Middle Class Before the Crisis!; Source: http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2009/060809_rav_middleclass.asp

14 National Disaster Coordinating Council. Situation Report no. 14 re Typhoon “Pepeng” (PARMA) TC-2009-00214-PHL as of 08 Oct 2009, 6:00PM. www.ndcc.gov.ph. Date accessed: October 8, 2009

 

 

Table 1. Number of Passengers, Load Factor and Revenues of Metro Rail Transit, Light Rail Transit and Megatren: 2004 to 2009

Year Metro Rail Transit (MRT3/Metrostar) Light Rail Transit
(LRT Line2/Yellow Line)
Megatren
(LRT Line2/Purple Line)
Total Number of Passengers (in million) Load Factor (%) Revenues
(in million pesos)
Total Number of Passengers (in million) Load Factor (%) Revenues
(in million pesos)
Total Number of Passengers (in million) Load Factor (%) Revenues
(in million pesos)
2004 122.6  38.1  1,499.9 96.9  61.5 1,389.7 20.7  15.1 273.2
January 10.1 36.7  123.3  8.5 66.5 123.4  0.4 5.8  4.9
February  9.8 39.0  119.6  8.0 67.4 114.6  0.4 5.4  4.7
March 10.7 38.3  129.3  8.2 64.1 118.1  0.4 4.8  4.5
April  8.6 36.9  104.0  6.3 54.7 91.0  0.7 9.4  9.8
May  9.7 35.8  118.7  7.4 60.9 106.6  1.2 12.2 15.4
June 10.2 38.2  125.5  7.8 72.4 112.5  1.8 13.9 23.8
July 11.0 39.6  133.4  8.5 66.0 121.6  2.5 18.7 33.1
August 10.6 37.9  129.8  8.4 57.0 119.6  2.5 18.7 32.7
September 10.6 38.7  130.9  8.5 54.7 121.4  2.7 21.2 35.2
October 10.6 37.8  131.6  8.4 54.1 119.9  2.4 19.9 31.6
November 10.3 38.9  126.6  8.3 59.0 118.3  2.8 25.2 38.2
December 10.5 39.2  127.0  8.6 61.3 122.8  3.0 26.6 39.5
2005 127.9 38.8 1,593.0 104.5 61.7 1,513.9 41.9 30.9 562.7
January 10.8 39.0  132.9  8.9 68.6 126.8  3.2 26.9 43.7
February  9.9 40.0  120.1  8.2 59.9 116.5  3.0 27.5 40.6
March 10.1 39.0  123.7  7.8 58.5 110.8  2.8 27.3 37.4
April 10.5 38.0  129.0  8.0 56.6 115.1  2.7 27.1 36.7
May 10.6 38.0  131.4  8.2 56.7 117.6  2.8 26.8 38.3
June 10.6 39.0  132.2  8.5 61.0 122.2  3.4 29.9 46.3
July 10.2 39.0  136.0  9.1 63.1 130.2  4.0 33.7 53.1
August 11.5 39.0  140.8  9.4 62.0 135.0  4.1 33.6 55.3
September 11.3 40.0  136.5  9.3 64.2 132.3  4.2 35.8 55.6
October 10.9 38.0  134.1  9.0 67.1 128.7  3.8 32.5 50.4
November 10.2 37.0  135.3  8.8 59.1 138.6  3.8 34.0 51.5
December 11.3 40.0  141.0  9.3 63.4 140.2  4.0 35.6 53.9
2006 134.9 76.8 1,651.6 111.1 61.5 1,594.6 47.6 30.9 642.8
January 11.9 40.0  143.0  9.8 61.8 141.6  4.2 33.6 56.0
February 10.8 84.0  133.1  8.9 62.7 126.9  3.8 33.7 50.2
March 11.3 75.0  144.0  9.7 62.5 138.6  4.0 33.7 53.8
April  9.9 88.0  120.9  7.6 58.0 108.5  2.8 31.3 38.3
May 11.6 76.0  139.6  9.2 59.5 132.8  3.5 32.7 47.5
June 11.2 87.0  141.3  9.4 60.3 135.3  3.9 28.3 53.5
July 11.2 81.0  136.9  9.4 61.2 135.4  4.1 28.9 57.8
August 11.7 82.0  141.2  9.8 66.7 140.3  4.5 31.2 59.9
September 10.6 82.0  128.4  9.0 62.0 128.9  4.1 31.5 55.3
October 11.5 82.0  142.1  9.3 62.8 133.6  4.0 28.0 54.5
November 11.7 58.0  142.1  9.4 61.2 135.9  4.3 30.8 58.3
December 11.5 86.0  139.0  9.5 59.3 136.9  4.3 27.6 57.7
2007 142.8 87.7 1,724.4 119.1 66.5 1,707.7 52.9 34.1 749.4
January 11.3 85.0  144.4 10.2 74.1 148.5  4.6 40.8 62.0
February 11.3 87.0  138.3  9.4 72.3 135.4  4.3 36.7 58.5
March 12.0 87.0  149.3 10.2 63.4 146.4  4.6 32.9 62.0
April 10.0 85.0  119.0  7.6 57.7 110.1  3.2 26.6 44.3
May 12.0 85.0  142.0  9.4 58.2 135.8  3.9 29.3 54.4
June 11.7 88.0  139.8  9.9 64.7 142.2  4.3 33.5 63.0
July 12.5 90.0  149.7 10.8 66.5 154.1  5.0 38.8 71.6
August 12.4 87.0  144.0 10.1 71.2 142.9  4.5 34.0 64.0
September 12.2 90.0  147.0 10.4 67.7 147.3  4.9 38.2 69.9
October 13.0 90.0  150.0 10.3 66.6 146.4  4.7 32.0 64.4
November 12.0 89.0  147.0 10.2 69.3 145.4  4.5 35.1 67.1
December 12.4 89.0  153.9 10.7 66.4 153.2  4.6 31.7 68.2
2008 149.5 91.8 1,845.0 138.1 62.4 1,962.4 58.6 38.8 815.6
January 12.8 90.0  160.4 11.1 69.8 159.0  4.9 34.6 70.1
February 12.1 91.0  150.2 10.6 71.0 150.4  4.6 36.8 66.7
March 11.2 90.0  138.3  9.7 57.1 138.3  4.2 31.7 57.4
April 12.5 92.0  153.0 10.7 58.3 152.2  4.2 31.1 57.8
May 12.8 92.0  158.1 11.2 59.4 160.7  4.5 39.2 60.7
June 11.9 90.0  145.7 11.0 60.8 157.8  4.6 42.4 65.7
July 13.2 93.0  162.2 12.4 60.0 175.4  5.5 46.3 76.9
August 12.6 93.0  155.5 11.8 59.0 167.6  5.3 42.4 74.3
September 12.8 95.0  158.2 12.6 60.6 178.1  5.6 43.9 77.3
October 13.1 92.0  159.2 12.5 59.2 176.3  5.1 38.1 68.3
November 12.4 91.0  155.5 12.5 67.2 177.4  5.2 41.5 72.8
December 12.1 92.0  148.7 12.0 66.6 169.3  4.9 38.1 67.5
2009                  
January 12.9 94.0  158.2 12.7 68.8 179.6  5.2 40.4 71.9
February 12.2 96.0  150.4 11.9 68.7 168.4  5.0 42.2 67.8
March 13.1 93.0  162.1 12.8 65.6 180.3  5.2 39.7 70.2
April 10.9 91.0  134.6 10.2 62.3 144.3  3.7 34.5 52.3
May 12.6 93.0  156.8 11.9 64.5 169.6  4.6 34.6 62.7
June 12.4 91.0  154.5 11.7 64.7 166.7  4.8 38.5 65.6
July 13.0 93.0  165.0 13.3 66.5 187.4 5.8 45.0 77.4

Note: Load Factor is the ratio between the actual passenger kilometer and the available passenger kilometer.

Source: Department of Transportation and Communication.

Table 2. National Roads: 1986 to 2008
(In kilometers)

Year All Types % Increas
(All Types)
Concrete % Increase
(Concrete)
Ratio of Concrete to Total Roads
(In %)
1986 26,230   6,162   23.5
1987 26,082 (0.6) 6,180  0.3 23.7
1988 26,070 (0.0) 6,215  0.6 23.8
1989 26,110  0.2 6,557  5.5 25.1
1990 26,272  0.6 6,731  2.7 25.6
1991 26,422  0.6 7,055  4.8 26.7
1992 26,554  0.5 7,250  2.8 27.3
1993 26,594  0.1 7,270  0.3 27.3
1994 26,659  0.2 7,447  2.4 27.9
1995 26,720  0.2 7,574  1.7 28.3
1996 27,369  2.4 8,349  10.2 30.5
1997 27,650  1.0 8,800  5.4 31.8
1998 27,893  0.9 9,294  5.6 33.3
1999 28,523  2.3 9,741  4.8 34.2
2000 29,056  1.9 10,336  6.1 35.6
2001 29,878  2.8 11,329  9.6 37.9
2002 30,030  0.5 11,911  5.1 39.7
2003 26,572 (11.5) 11,823 (0.7) 44.5
2004 27,853  4.8 12,486  5.6 44.8
2005 28,664  2.9 12,764  2.2 44.5
2006 28,978  1.1 12,970  1.6 44.8
2007 29,370  1.4 13,378  3.1 45.5
2008 29,650  1.0 13,584  1.5 45.8

Notes: 

1. Total for the years 2003 and 2004 does not include other and unspecified national roads.
2. Excludes data from Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM)
3. Types of Roads are Earth, Gravel, Asphalt and Concrete.

Source: Department of Public Works and Highways.

 

Figure 1. Ratio of concrete to total roads (in %)

Figure 1

 

Table 3. Length of National Road by Surface Type: As of 30 November 2008
(In kilometers)

Region Concrete Asphalt Gravel Earth Total Ratio of Concrete to Total Length of Roads Ratio of Length of National Roads in km per 100,000 population*
Phils. 13,584.4 8,092.1 7,893.8  80.0 29,650.4 45.8 34.1
CAR  639.0  98.6 1,108.9 4.2 1,850.7 34.5 16.4
NCR  560.6  526.0 0.1  -  1,086.6  51.6  66.8
I  883.7  571.2  134.0  20.6 1,609.6 54.9 32.4
II 945.5 314.2 510.9  3.3  1,773.9  53.3  54.6
III 1,018.4  837.4 219.1  -  2,074.9  49.1  21.2
IV-A 891.0 1,186.3 302.8  -  2,380.2  37.4  20.9
IV-B 755.5 315.1  1,150.5  3.9  2,225.0  34.0  77.6
V 982.0 666.9 588.2  4.6  2,241.8  43.8  40.8
VI  1,250.8 948.9 676.7  3.6  2,880.0  43.4  39.5
VII 926.6 859.8 231.4 16.2  2,034.1  45.6  30.1
VIII  1,568.7 384.3 402.6 17.1  2,372.6  66.1  55.5
IX 561.8 297.6 357.9  1.5  1,218.8  46.1  36.4
X 736.6 442.0 537.2  -  1,715.8  42.9  41.1
XI 650.1 292.1 500.4  4.9  1,447.5  44.9  34.3
XII 594.7 252.0 536.6  0.1  1,383.4  43.0  35.4
XIII 619.3 99.8 636.5  -  1,355.5  45.7  55.2

* Based on the 2008 Regional Population Projection, National Statistics Office

Note: Excludes data from ARMM.

Source: Department of Public Works and Highways.

Table 4. Number and Length of National Bridges in the Philippines: 1986 to 2008
(Length in linear meters)

Year Number of Bridges Length of Bridges % increase in length
1986 7,379 230,226.4  
1987 7,211 225,640.7 (2.0)
1988 6,928 235,519.7 4.4
1989 6,928 235,519.7 0.0
1990 7,201 235,519.7 0.0
1991 6,936 244,499.9 3.8
1992 7,031 250,191.2 2.3
1993 7,046 248,766.0 (0.6)
1994 7,112 255,261.1 2.6
1995 7,133 256,738.0 0.6
1996 7,347 261,015.0 1.7
1997 7,380 261,989.0 0.4
1998 7,400 266,833.0 1.8
1999 7,523 273,285.0 2.4
2000 7,306 271,293.0 (0.7)
2001 283,000.0 4.3
2002 294,130.0 3.9
2003 7,165 277,586.0 (5.6)
2004 7,324 282,960.1 1.9
2005 7,560 296,101.8 4.6
2006 7,517 301,365.3 1.8
2007 7,743 314,452.8 4.3
2008 7,758 327,720.6 4.2
% increase (1986 to 2008) 5.1 42.3  

Note: Excludes data from ARMM

Source: Department of Public Works and Highways.

Table 5. Length of National Bridges by Type: As of 30 December 2008
(In linear meters)

Major Food Items Permanent Temporary Grand Total Ratio of Number of Permanent to Total Number of National Bridges Ratio of Length of Permanent to Total Length of National Bridges Regional Share of Number of Bridges Ratio of Length of National Bridges in LM per 100,000 population*
Concrete Steel Total Bailey Timber Total Number of Permanent Number of Temporary Total Number of Bridges Length
Phils. 268,969  43,340 312,309  13,173  2,239  15,412  6,946  812  7,758 327,721 89.5 95.3 100.0 376.4
CAR  6,188  2,978  9,166  1,756 17  1,773 221  85 306  10,938 72.2 83.8  3.9  97.2
NCR  30,599 597 31,196 -  -  -  330  - 330 31,196 100.0 100.0 4.3 1,919.0
I 22,653 7,093  29,746  327  -  327  499 19 518 30,073  96.3  98.9 6.7  604.6
II   18,956 4,911 23,867  303  55  358  410 25 435 24,226  94.3  98.5 5.6 745.4
III 25,426 3,935 29,361  21 102  123  618 8 626 29,484  98.7  99.6 8.1 301.8
IV-A 15,067  958 16,025  529  14  543  584 36 620 16,568  94.2  96.7 8.0 145.3
IV-B 15,733 1,642 17,374 3,066  491 3,558  467  147 614 20,932  76.1  83.0 7.9 730.4
V 19,972 1,389 21,361  730  -  730  552 50 602 22,091  91.7  96.7 7.8 401.9
VI 23,052 3,979 27,031 1,801  79 1,880  646 67 713 28,911  90.6  93.5 9.2 396.6
VII 13,819 2,073 15,892  517  47  564  470 34 504 16,457  93.3  96.6 6.5 243.7
VIII 25,646 5,474 31,120 1,151  759 1,910  775  135 910 33,030  85.2  94.2 11.7 773.0
IX 8,712 1,338 10,050  51  20  71  232 5 237 10,121  97.9  99.3 3.1 302.0
X 11,647 2,548 14,194  299 6  305  346 14 360 14,499  96.1  97.9 4.6 347.4
XI 10,837  966 11,803  402  -  402  238 14 252 12,205  94.4  96.7 3.2 289.0
XII 9,454  971 10,424  419  -  419  264 20 284 10,843  93.0  96.1 3.7 277.8
XIII 11,210 2,488 13,698 1,800  649 2,448  294 153 447 16,146  65.8  84.8 5.8 658.0

* Based on the 2008 Regional Population Projection, National Statistics Office

Source: Department of Public Works and Highways

Table 6. National Roads and Bridges1, by Administration

President Term National Roads
(All Types)
National Roads (Permanent) National Bridges
(All types)
Aquino 1986-1992      
  1986 26,230 6,162 230,226
  1992 26,554 7,250 250,191
  % increase,
1986 - 1992
1.2 17.7 8.7
  Annualized,
1986-1992
0.2 2.7 1.4
Ramos 1992-1998      
  1992 26,554 7,250 250,191
  1998 27,893 9,294 266,833
  % increase,
1992 - 1998
5.0 28.2 6.7
  Annualized,
1992 - 1998
0.8 4.2 1.1
Estrada 1998-2001      
  1998 27,893 9,294 266,833
  2001 29,878 11,329 283,000
  % increase,
1998 - 2001
7.1 21.9 6.1
  Annualized,
1998 - 2001
2.3 6.8 2.0
Arroyo 2001-20082      
  2001 29,878 11,329 283,000
  20033 26,572 11,823 277,586
  2008 29,650 13,584 327,721
  % increase,
2001 - 2008
-0.8 19.9 15.8
  % increase,
2003-2008
11.6 14.9 18.1
  Annualized,
2001 - 2008
-0.1 2.6 2.1
  Annualized,
2003-2008
2.2 2.8 3.4

Notes:

1. Annual Data are on Table 2 (for National Roads) and Table 4 (for National Bridges).
2. Available data is until 2008 only
3. In 2003, a new system was adopted (called Road and Bridge Information Application -RBIA) which uses satellite imaging and aims to provide more accurate measurement of roads.

Table 7. Number of Motor Vehicles Registered: 2000 to 2008

Year Total Motor Vehicles Private For Hire Government Diplomatic Exempt % Increase in Motor Vehicle Registration
2000 3,701,173 2,835,801  794,499 66,468 3,391 1,014  
2001 3,865,862 3,010,974  794,306 56,695 2,698 1,189 4.45
2002 4,187,673 3,274,316  851,145 58,142 2,904 1,166 8.32
2003 4,292,272 3,389,022  830,842 68,437 2,816 1,155 2.50
2004 4,760,593 3,795,950  885,007 74,356 4,197 1,083 10.91
2005 5,059,753 4,079,186  898,028 77,953 3,284 1,302 6.28
2006 5,331,574 4,362,586  886,978 75,803 2,227 3,980 5.37
2007 5,530,052 4,558,727  887,023 70,528 2,406 11,368 3.72
2008 5,891,272 4,908,332  899,211 73,307 4,884 5,538 6.53
Annualized Growth, 2000-2008 6.0 7.1 1.6 1.2 4.7 23.6

Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 8. Number of Registered Government-Owned Vehicles: 2000 to 2008

Year Total Motor Vehicles Government-Owned Vehicles Newly-Owned Government Vehicle Ratio of Government-owned Vehicles to Total
(In %)
Ratio of Newly-Owned to Total Government Vehicles
(In %)
2000 3,701,173 66,468 6,623  1.8  10.0
2001 3,865,862 56,695 4,426  1.5  7.8
2002 4,187,673 58,142 3,749  1.4  6.4
2003 4,292,272 68,437 7,325  1.6  10.7
2004 4,760,593 74,356 6,820  1.6  9.2
2005 5,059,753 77,953 8,368  1.5  10.7
2006 5,331,574 75,803 6,200  1.4  8.2
2007 5,530,052 70,528 4,657  1.3  6.6
2008 5,891,272 73,307 6,553  1.2  8.9

Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 9. Number of Registered Private Vehicles, by Type: 2000 to 2008

Year Total Motor Vehicles Cars Utility Vehicles (UVs) Buses Trucks Motorcycles/ Tricycles Trailers % Share of UVs to total Private Vehicles % Share of Motorcycles/ Tricycles to total Private Vehicles
2000 3,701,173  688,402 1,171,953 3,686  222,893  725,330 23,537 41.3 25.6
2001 3,865,862  681,050 1,271,420 3,711  229,664  804,081 21,048 42.2 26.7
2002 4,187,673  694,557 1,406,202 3,525  232,965  916,332 20,735 42.9 28.0
2003 4,292,272  688,419 1,435,919 4,114  231,597 1,008,610 20,363 42.4 29.8
2004 4,760,593  731,450 1,522,513 6,143  241,923 1,273,530 20,391 40.1 33.5
2005 5,059,753  729,299 1,530,560 4,355  241,624 1,552,748 20,600 37.5 38.1
2006 5,331,574  739,702 1,535,613 4,653  258,756 1,802,582 21,280 35.2 41.3
2007 5,530,052  700,384 1,534,634 6,696  255,522 2,039,850 21,641 33.7 44.7
2008 5,891,272  713,175 1,535,003 6,184  269,367 2,360,304 24,299 31.3 48.1

Note: Included here are the motorcycles used in habal-habal operations.

Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 10. Number of Driver's Licenses/Permits Issued, by Sex and
Number of Motor Vehicles Registered by Type, by Region: 2008

Region Driver's Licenses/Permits Issued Total Motor Vehicles Registered Ratio of Registered Vehicles per 100,000 population Cars UV/SUV Trucks Buses Motorcycles/
Tricycles
Trailers
Number Male Female Sex Ratio
(Male/
Female)
Phils. 4,184,499 3,513,810 670,689  5.2 5,891,272  6,767  761,919 1,793,659  296,276  29,745 2,982,511  27,162
NCR 1,270,213 1,008,882 261,331 3.9 1,670,150 14,842 423,759 638,229 61,336 9,521 525,082 12,223
CAR 54,083  46,660 7,423 6.3 68,119 4,190 9,012 35,896 5,282 355 17,522 52
I 219,220 193,442 25,778 7.5 328,037 6,595 22,804 76,606 12,281 1,981 213,704 661
II 123,621 111,923 11,698 9.6 210,623 6,481 8,998 51,348 14,708 1,058 131,917 2,594
III 539,909 448,537 91,372 4.9 804,016 8,229 74,887 250,710 48,056 3,002 423,950 3,411
IV 604,546 511,226 93,320 5.5 863,292 6,050 92,424 262,367 26,020 4,461 476,873 1,147
IV-A 542,827 457,078 85,749 5.3 778,128 6,824  N  O   B  R  E  A  K  D O  W  N 
IV-B 61,719  54,148 7,571 7.2 85,164 2,972
V 134,040 115,667 18,373 6.3 185,093 3,367 8,845 35,262 8,150 1,534 131,037 265
VI 211,553 185,928 25,625 7.3 310,266 4,256 25,495 87,317 27,658 1,721 167,371 704
VII 308,224 255,658 52,566 4.9 478,097 7,079 46,046 135,245 30,726 2,140 261,072 2,868
VIII 81,745  69,390 12,355 5.6 124,010 2,902 4,222 28,503 8,814 893 81,381 197
IX 101,094  89,931 11,163 8.1 174,920 5,219 4,420 34,098 6,675 808 128,721 198
X 143,584 125,479 18,105 6.9 170,892 4,094 11,674 47,593 12,472 780 97,720 653
XI 176,279 153,845 22,434 6.9 234,379 5,550 18,497 54,433 15,476 633 144,014 1,326
XII 149,832 136,708 13,124 10.4 207,426 5,313 8,894 43,917 15,655 618 137,521 821
XIII 66,556  60,534 6,022 10.1 61,952 2,525 1,942 12,135 2,967 240 44,626   42

Notes:

1. Licenses/Permits issued in NCR are total of Central Office and NCR Office;
2. Licenses/Permits issued in Region VI-Kalibo D.O. excludes June and July 2008;
3. Population excludes ARMM.

Source: Land Transportation Office.

Table 11. Ratios Derived from Table 10: 2008

Region Regional Share of Driver's Licence/Permit Issued
(in %)
Regional Share of Driver's Licence/Permit Issued to Females
(in %)
Ratio of Registered Vehicles per License/Permits Issued Ratio of Driver's Licenses/Permits per 100,000 population Ratio of Registered Vehicles per Km Length of National Road Regional Share of Registered Motor Vehicles
(In%)
Regional Share of Registered Cars
(In%)
Regional Share of Registered UV/SUV (In%) Regional Share of Registered Trucks
(In%)
Regional Share of Registered Buses
(In%)
Regional Share of Registered Motorcycles/
Tricycles
(In%)
Regional Share of Registered Trailers
(In%)
Phils. 100.0  16.0 1.4 4,806 199 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
NCR  28.7  20.6 1.3 11,288 902  28.3  55.6  35.6  20.7  32.0  17.6  45.0
CAR 1.3  13.7 1.3 3,327  63 1.2 1.2 2.0 1.8 1.2   0.6 0.2
I 5.5  11.8 1.5 4,407 204 5.6 3.0 4.3 4.1 6.7 7.2 2.4
II 3.2 9.5 1.7 3,804 119 3.6 1.2 2.9 5.0 3.6 4.4 9.6
III  12.8  16.9 1.5 5,526 388  13.6 9.8  14.0  16.2  10.1  14.2  12.6
IV            14.7  12.1  14.6 8.8  15.0  16.0 4.2
IV-A    13.0  15.8 1.4 4,760 350  N  O   B  R  E  A  K  D O  W  N 
IV-B 1.5  12.3 1.4 2,154  38
V 3.3  13.7 1.4 2,438  83 3.1 1.2 2.0 2.8 5.2 4.4 1.0
VI 5.3  12.1 1.5 2,902 108 5.3 3.3 4.9 9.3 5.8 5.6 2.6
VII 7.3    17.1 1.6 4,563 235 8.1 6.0 7.5  10.4 7.2 8.8  10.6
VIII 2.0  15.1 1.5    1,913  52 2.1 0.6 1.6 3.0 3.0 2.7 0.7
IX 2.6  11.0   1.7 3,017 144 3.0 0.6 1.9 2.3 2.7 4.3 0.7
X 3.6  12.6 1.2 3,440 100 2.9 1.5 2.7 4.2 2.6 3.3 2.4
XI 4.4  12.7 1.3 4,174 162 4.0 2.4 3.0 5.2 2.1 4.8 4.9
XII 3.9   8.8 1.4 3,838 150 3.5 1.2 2.4 5.3 2.1 4.6 3.0
XIII 1.7 9.0 0.9 1,960  46 1.1 0.3 0.7 1.0 0.8 1.5   0.2

 

Table 12. LTO Revenue Collection by Region: 2004 to 2008

Region 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008  %Increase
'05/'04 
 %Increase
'06/'05 
 %Increase
'07/'06 
 %Increase
'08/'07 
Phils. 8,866,804,709.33 9,618,606,335.45 10,087,161,922.96 10,438,575,746.96 11,048,015,053.92 8.5 4.9 3.5 5.8
NCR 3,306,833,472.04 3,628,557,791.22 3,734,132,616.61 3,823,015,288.11 4,052,156,650.49 9.7 2.9 2.4 6.0
C.A.R. 127,891,780.85 132,425,917.92 140,744,745.97 143,913,826.27 150,982,126.89 3.5 6.3 2.3 4.9
I 382,981,298.82 414,607,696.00 429,172,322.28 455,873,358.48 475,970,005.73 8.3 3.5 6.2 4.4
II 261,811,771.68 275,702,404.95 291,089,755.46 308,862,576.92 341,376,285.95 5.3 5.6 6.1 10.5
III 1,135,398,980.89 1,213,683,697.13 1,278,013,008.37 1,332,485,444.07 1,396,307,461.21 6.9 5.3 4.3 4.8
IV-A 1,060,796,880.42 1,148,348,416.42 1,203,350,049.47 1,257,639,421.76 1,341,562,410.29 8.3 4.8 4.5 6.7
IV-B 88,240,072.00 94,702,664.27 96,177,984.86 99,115,556.67 110,994,696.29 7.3 1.6 3.1 12.0
V 209,775,502.63 226,314,961.93 228,235,075.20 236,183,998.63 257,065,007.98 7.9 0.8 3.5 8.8
VI 488,507,221.16 521,469,114.52 559,391,318.65 575,073,119.35 585,666,729.78 6.7 7.3 2.8 1.8
VII 704,837,133.95 730,199,228.54 781,959,889.41 814,532,865.02 827,987,757.01 3.6 7.1 4.2 1.7
VIII 157,911,961.47 167,198,254.85 174,250,942.38 185,883,913.80 191,893,745.43 5.9 4.2 6.7 3.2
IX 159,899,491.40 178,023,500.85 171,640,943.57 181,513,979.75 204,560,063.25 11.3 (3.6) 5.8 12.7
X 225,800,937.92 247,026,330.75 274,034,853.21 282,022,334.11 305,769,377.13 9.4 10.9 2.9 8.4
XI 299,175,924.59 326,818,173.82 365,266,612.76 385,822,974.59 415,489,045.43 9.2 11.8 5.6 7.7
XII 185,612,469.11 236,391,097.97 279,289,855.73 274,875,678.05 301,877,975.66 27.4 18.1 (1.6) 9.8
XIII 71,329,810.40 77,137,084.31 80,411,949.03 81,761,411.38 88,355,715.40 8.1 4.2 1.7 8.1

Notes:

1. NCR figures are total of NCR Office and Central Office;
2. With estimated figures for Regions V for the month of Nov. & Dec. 2006;
3. Excluding the reports of the ff:  R.O. & E-Patrol (Reg. VII-Dec. 2007); and Patin-ay D.O. (CARAGA-Dec. 2007);
4. Excluding Iloilo D. O. (June-July 2008), Iloilo Licensing Center (June to Dec 2008) and Kalibo D.O. (June to July 2008);
5. Total revenue comes from Motor Vehicle User's Charge (MVUC), Fines and Penalties (Law Enforcement), Licenses and Others.
Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 13. Most Frequently Committed Traffic Violations with Corresponding Fines/Penalties: 2004 to 2008

VIOLATION 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Fines/Penalties for Traffic and Administrative Violations Remarks
RA 8750 Seatbelt Use Act   14,137 139,618 154,984 135,497 141,372 1,000 Failure to Install Seatbelt; 250 for failure to wear seatbelt
Sec 13 No CR/OR on Hand   38,497   47,805   55,471   53,782   63,508 150  
Sec. 11 Unregistered/ Invalid MV Registration   24,504   30,505   42,665   53,863   62,044  2,000-4,000  2,000 if committed by the driver w/o the knowledge and consent of the owner;
4,000 if the driver is also the processor of the subject MV
Sec. 54 Prohibited Parking   37,371   40,217   45,655   48,437   58,830 200  
Sec. 68Z Obstruction   59,149   61,468   47,468   48,296   49,535 200  
Sec. 09 Student Driver Operating an MV w/o Accompanying Licensed Driver   13,145   19,398   28,232   38,401   46,235 500  
Sec. 01 Driving w/o D_License   15,334   19,946   26,485   33,673   37,557 1,500  
Sec. 02 Driving w/ Delinquent / Invalid Suspended, Ineffectual or Revoked License   16,119   20,374   29,241   33,969   36,518  400-1,000  400 if expired;
1,000 if license is suspended or revoked or improper
Sec. 57 Driving in Slippers/ Sleeveless Shirt (For-Hire)   16,688   26,520   32,020   34,626   32,088  1,000-5,000  counted as reckless driving
TOP 9 VIOLATIONS* 234,944 405,851 462,221 480,544 527,687    
% INCREASE IN TOP 9 VIOLATIONS   72.7 13.9    4.0    9.8    
TOTAL APPREHENDED DRIVERS 617,111 719,563 892,319 899,701 930,088    
% INCREASE IN APPREHENSIONS   16.6 24.0    0.8    3.4    
TOTAL LICENSES/PERMITS ISSUED   3,284,170   3,548,041   3,711,856   3,972,645   4,184,499    
% INCREASE IN LICENSES/PERMITS      8.0    4.6    7.0    5.3    
RATIO OF APPREHENDED DRIVERS TO TOTAL LICENSES ISSUED 18.8% 20.3% 24.0% 22.6% 22.2%    

Source: Land Transportation Office

Notes:

1. Excluding the reports of Tagbilaran D.O. & Dumaguete D.O. (Reg. VII-Dec. 2008)
2. With estimated figures for Region V for the months of Nov. & Dec. 2006 
3. Excludes data of LTO-C.O.-LES for the period Jan.-Sept. 2005
4. Top 9 Violations includeRA 8750, No OR/CR on Hand, Unregistered/Invalid MV Registration, Prohibited Parking, Obstruction, Student Driver Operating an MV w/o Accompanying Licensed Driver, Driving w/ Delinquent/ Invalid/ Suspended, Ineffectual or Revoked License and Driving in Slippers (for For-Hire).

 

Table 14. Top 5 Most Expensive Traffic and Administrative Violations to Commit

VIOLATION Amount (PhP) Remarks
1. Operating a right-hand drive motor vehicle   50,000  
2. Unauthorized use of bell, siren or exhaust whistle   15,000  with forfeiture of the said gadgets in favor of the government 
3. Driving Under the Influence of Drugs   10,000  
4. Illegal transfer or use of MV regularly issued MV plates, tags or stickers except security plates on authorized MV   10,000  1. owners/operators are conclusively presumed to have committed the illegal transfer;
2. drivers of MV involved in illegal transfer of plates, sticker shall suffer the suspension of their driver's license for 3 months; 
 3. if the MV is used in the commissions of a crime, its owner shall suffer the penalty of 12,000 fine and suspension of
plates and registration certificate and Official Receipt for 2 years 
5. Tourist operating or allowing the use of non-Philippine registered MV beyond the 90-day period of his sojourn in the country     5,000  1. the MV shall not be allowed to operate by the confiscation of its plates, OR & CR until properly registered;
2. in addition, if the driver is a holder of local driver's license, the same shall be suspended for one month 

Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 15. LTO Revenue Collection by Source: 2004 to 2008

Source 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008  inc 05/04   inc 06/05   inc 07/06   inc 08/07 
Fines and Penalties (Law Enforcement) 231,503,005.55 283,451,728.27 383,594,462.84 356,506,460.78 399,807,393.79         22.4         35.3         (7.1)        12.1
License Fee 536,252,766.65 570,769,411.95 596,826,662.63 620,180,644.37 692,816,186.50           6.4           4.6          3.9        11.7
Motor Vehicle Users Charge 6,649,035,538.56 7,217,253,124.26 7,493,998,775.21 7,737,627,762.49 7,956,988,412.50           8.5           3.8          3.3          2.8
Others 1,450,013,398.57 1,547,132,070.97 1,612,742,022.28 1,724,260,879.32 1,998,403,061.13           6.7           4.2          6.9        15.9
TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTION 8,866,804,709.33 9,618,606,335.45 10,087,161,922.96 10,438,575,746.96 11,048,015,053.92           8.5           4.9          3.5          5.8
ratio of fines and penalties to total revenue collection                           2.6                           2.9                           3.8                           3.4                           3.6        
ratio of license fee to total revenue collection                           6.0                           5.9                           5.9                           5.9                           6.3        
ratio of MVUC to total revenue collection                         75.0                         75.0                         74.3                         74.1                         72.0        
ratio of others to total revenue collection                         16.4                         16.1                         16.0                         16.5                         18.1        

Note: Others include trust liabilities, science tax, miscellaneous income, capital revenue and other penalties on MV, licenses and science tax.

Source: Land Transportation Office

Table 16. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS: 1998 to 2007

Year Number of Accident Damage to Property
(number of vehicles)
ratio of damaged vehicles to total number of MV registered
Fatal Non-fatal Total
1998 940 1,863 2,803 6,537                          0.2
1999 719 2,150 2,869 7,726                          0.2
2000 704 1,719 2,423 11,386                          0.3
2001 627 1,399 2,026 6,696                          0.2
2002 714 3,034 3,748 9,623                          0.2
2003 800 4,177 4,977 11,441                          0.3
2004 1,054 3,860 4,914 9,288                          0.2
2005 578 3,779 4,357 7,068                          0.1
2006 674 3,767 4,441 10,623                          0.2
2007 718 3,569 4,287 7,267                          0.1
Average                                  0.2

Note: Fatal accidents are those that caused death

Source: Department of Transportation and Communication.

Table 17. COMPARATIVE STATISTICS ON TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENTS:
1998 to 2007

Year Number of Accident Number of Fatalities ratio of fatalities to accidents
TRAFFIC MARITIME AIR TRAFFIC MARITIME TRAFFIC MARITIME
               
2000 2,423 151 162 704 177 0.3 1.2
2001 2,026 168 8 627 59 0.3 0.4
2002 3,748 152 21 714 73 0.2 0.5
2003 4,977 255 20 800 74 0.2 0.3
2004 4,914 227 23 1,054 144 0.2 0.6
2005 4,357 122 17 578 25 0.1 0.2
2006 4,441 114 15 674 62 0.2 0.5
Total 26,886 1,189 266 5,151 614 0.2 0.5
share of accidents to total 94.9% 4.2% 0.9%        

Source: Department of Transportation and Communication.

Notes:

1. No data available on the number of Accidents in Air from 1998 to 1999 and 2007
2. No available data on fatalities on Air accidents
3. Don Juan Tragedy happened in 1980 with 18 dead and 115 missing
4. The worst marine mishap happened in 1987 when MV Doña Paz collided with MT Vector leaving 1800++ casualties

 

Posted 12 October 2009

 

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