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Headlines Statistically Speaking

Statistics on Violence Against Women and Children:
A Morally Rejuvenating Philippine Society?
by Dr. Romulo A. Virola 1
Secretary General, NSCB

We do not enjoy reading sensationalized stories on victims of violence, especially women and children, and we doubt whether gory media reporting of details of such crimes is protected by its responsibility to provide information to the public. In fact, we doubt if it contributes to the prevention, and if it at all, to the upliftment of our society.  But we must know and talk about violence against women and children if we are to break the culture of silence that is conducive to the perpetration and perpetuation of these sins of modern society.

Women in Especially Difficult Circumstances (WEDC)2 include women who have been victims of sexual abuse, physical abuse/maltreatment/battering, illegal recruitment, involuntary prostitution, armed conflict, human trafficking, detention, and others like HIV patients/potentials, strandees, abandoned, emotionally distressed, unwed mothers, sexually exploited, voluntary committed/surrendered, and neglected victims of disaster.

Child abuse, on the other hand, includes victimization of children under the following circumstances: abandoned, neglected, sexual abuse, sexually exploited, physical abuse/maltreatment, illegal recruitment, child trafficking, abduction and armed conflict. Unfortunate that we have ignored in this listing the case of children who, for one reason or another, have been denied the right to education, and whose future therefore, has been compromised and contorted, if not lost. Yes, bicycle for education will surely help our children in far-flung areas who have to travel many hours and many kilometers by foot so they could  be not unlike  others who know how to read and write!  Don’t we wish civil society would spend more of its time helping solve  this very practical problem of our poor?

In recognition of the importance of generating statistics on gender concerns, the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB), with much gentle pushing from our friends in the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW) from the time of the great Remy Rikken created the Interagency Committee (IAC) on Gender Statistics3  whose mandate includes the formulation of measures that will improve the system of collection and dissemination of sex-disaggregated data at the national and local levels and the recommendation of appropriate measures to the NSCB Executive Board for the generation of data support on gender issues.

Gender statistics, of course, is not just about generation of sex-disaggregated data. It is about the production, dissemination and utilization of sex-disaggregated statistics on various gender concerns that push the agenda of gender equality as articulated in the World Conferences on Women. The 1995 Beijing Platform for Action (4th World Conference) specifies the following actions to be taken by national and international statistical organizations: (a)  collect gender and age-disaggregated data on poverty and all aspects of economic activity and develop qualitative and quantitative statistical indicators to facilitate the assessment of economic performance from a gender perspective; and (b) devise suitable statistical means to recognize and make visible the full extent of the work of women and all their contributions to the national economy, including their contribution in the unremunerated and domestic sectors, and examine the relationship of women’s unremunerated work to the incidence of and their vulnerability to poverty.

The Philippine Statistical System (PSS) is recognized internationally as one of the most advanced  among the developing countries in the area of gender statistics. There have been many PSS initiatives on gender statistics such as the pioneering NSCB publication “Statistical Handbook on Women and Men in the Philippines”4 which is now produced nationally and regionally, the conduct of a pilot Time Use Survey (TUS) by the National Statistics Office (NSO)5, the estimation of the contribution of women to the economy6, and the creation of the IAC on Gender Statistics, among others. Aside from information generated on how women and men use their time, a TUS would allow the compilation of a better measure of the contribution of women to the economy. However, a TUS is costly to administer and our NSO has not been given the required budget to be able to do a TUS on a regular basis.

The PSS is  now generating gender statistics in different areas of concern. For one, our Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has been compiling data on WEDC7 and child abuse. The reader is forewarned however, that these statistics are based only on cases reported to/by the DSWD and therefore may have missed many cases that the culture of silence has veiled out and away from public view. The numbers, including the regional distribution, could also be affected by the manpower and financial constraints as well as the varying levels of efficiency and priorities of the regional offices of the DSWD8 in the delivery of basic services. Subject to these and other similar limitations, the DSWD data reveal the following:

  1. The number of WEDC who have been served by the DSWD (1998-2007) has dwindled over the years9. The most common cases of WEDC are women who are physically abused/maltreated/battered followed by the group that includes HIV patients/potentials, emotionally distressed, stranded, unwed mothers, neglected victims of disaster, etc.  and  sexually abused women (Table 1,  Figures 1A and 1B ).

  2. NCR10 used to have the most number of WEDC, but in 2007, Regions III, X, IX,  VII and  VIII, in that order, had the most number of WEDC (Table 2).

  3. In 2007, the most common case of WEDC of physical abuse/maltreatment/battering is most rampant in Region IX, followed by Region VII, CAR, Region III and  Region II (Table 3 and Figure 2).

  4. Reports of child abuse are likewise on the downtrend. Most common cases are victims of  sexual abuse, neglected  children, physically abused/maltreated and the abandoned. Good to know that sexual abuse, the most common case of child abuse,  has declined too, together with the number of abandoned children. However, between 2006 and 2007, the number of children who have been victims of physical abuse/maltreatment, child labor, illegal recruitment, trafficking and armed conflict alarmingly increased. ( Table 4 and Figures 3A and 3B)

  5. By region11, the most number of child abuse cases served by the DSWD in 2007 came from Region IX, Region III, Region VII, NCR, and Region I (Table 5)

  6. Girl victims of abuse outnumber boys, two to one. Among girls, the majority of the victims belong to the age groups 10 to below 14 and 14 to below 18; among boys, the most number of victims belong to age groups 1 to below 5 and 5 to below 10. (Table 5).

  7. The highest number of reported cases comes from sexual abuse among girls, more than half of which are rape victims, and from neglect among boys. (Table 5)

  8. It is interesting to note that the clientele of the DSWD has dramatically shifted during the last three years towards services to families: from 237,009 families or 1.34 % of the total number of families  in 2004 to 1, 387,260 or  7.35% in 2005 to 1,838,891 or 10.57% in 2006 to 1,200,210 or 6.44% in 2007. After families, the next biggest groups of DSWD clients are children and women with the youth and the disabled/senior citizens as the smallest groups. Noticeable also was the big jump in women clients served by the DSWD in 2006.  However, the DSWD has been serving much less than 1 per cent of the total population of the last four groups: women, children, youth and the elderly. (Tables 6.1 and 6.2 and Figures 4A and 4B.).

  9. In 2007, among the regions,  the DSWD served the most number of families in  Region V, Region VI, Region IV-A, Region VIII, Region II and Region XII; the most number of women in Region IX, NCR, Region VII, Region XI, Region III and Region X; the most number of youth in Region IX, NCR, Region VII, Region XI and Region IV-A; the most number of children in NCR, Region III, Region IX, Region IV-A, Region VII and Region I; and the most number of senior citizens in NCR, Region IV-A, Region VII and Region IX.  (Table 7 and Figures 5A-5E)

Certainly, it is worthwhile for the DSWD to examine the profile of its clientele and its priorities to make sure some sectors are not being left behind in the delivery of services they need. And if the DSWD reports on declining number of cases of WEDC and child abuse are reflective of the real trend  ( underreporting causes the levels to be lower than actual), we should all be pleased. Kudos therefore to our NCRFW, the Council for the Welfare of Children (CWC), the DSWD, the Department of Health (DOH), the non-government organizations (NGOs), the civil society, the churches, and all those who have fought and continue to fight for the rights of our women and children. May this signal the moral rejuvenation much needed by our society!

 

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the authors at ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph and bb.balamban@nscb.gov.ph.

_________________________

1 Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) and Chairman of the Statistical Research and Training Center (SRTC). He holds a Ph. D. in Statistics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, U.S.A. and has taught mathematics and statistics at the University of the Philippines. He is also a past president of the Philippine Statistical Association. This article is co-written by Bernadette B. Balamban, Statistical Coordination Officer of the NSCB. The authors thank  Jessamyn O. Encarnacion,  Teresita M. Almarines, Noel S. Nepomuceno, Redencion M. Ignacio, and Candido J. Astrologo, Jr. for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB.

2 Glossary of Terms, Philippine Statistical Yearbook PSY) of the NSCB. The definitions of WEDC and child abuse were approved under NSCB Board Resolution No. 6, Series of 2001.

3 The IAC on Gender Statistics was created by the NSCB on  4 January 2002 thru NSCB Memorandum Order No. 003 Series of 2002. It was an offshoot of the Task Force to Generate Statistics on Violence Against Women and Children created by NSCB Memorandum Order No. 1 Series of 1997. The IAC is chaired by the NCRFW and has the following member agencies: NSO, NSCB, CHED, DSWD, NEDA, Bureau of Women and Young Workers, DTI, BAS, DepEd, DENR, BLES, DILG, DOH, PNP, DFA, SRTC, TESDA, DFA and the Women’s Studies Association of the Philippines. Thru Resolution No. 12 Series of 2005, the NSCB approved on  19 October 2005,  recommendations of the IAC towards further improvement of  Gender Statistics in the PSS.

4 The initial publication in 1995 was funded thru the NSCB-UNESCAP project on Improving Gender Statistics funded by UNIFEM.

5 Funded by CIDA ISP-II.

6 The NSCB has produced and presented a number of papers  on this subject including Measuring the Contribution of Women to the Philippine Economy, 7th National Convention on Statistics, October 1998 (Virola R. and S. de Perio),  Women’s Contribution to the Economy – the Philippine Experience,  52nd Session of the International Statistical Institute, 1999 ( Virola, Romulo A.), Are Pinoy Machos Getting More Domesticated? , Statistically Speaking, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/headlines/StatsSpeak/2007/111207_rav_domesticated.asp, November 2007 (Virola R. and J. Encarnacion), Measuring the Contribution of Women to the Economy and Estimating Women in Poverty – the Philippine Experience, Global Forum on Gender Statistics, December 2007 (Encarnacion, Jessamyn O.), and Do Women Contribute Less Than Men to Nation Building?, 10th National Convention on Statistics, October 2007 (Virola, R., J. Encarnacion, A. Zaguirre and R. Perez). The last paper was also presented by J. Encarnacion in a Lecture in Miriam College, February 2008 and in an Advocacy Forum on Gender Statistics of the IACGS in May 2008.

7 The Philippine National Police is also compiling statistics on Violence Against Women based on reported cases. Obviously, the two sets of data will not necessarily reflect identical figures.

8 For the fifth time, the DSWD ranked first in the July 2008 Ulat ng Bayan survey of Pulse Asia, garnering the highest approval rating of 65  per cent,  http://www.dswd.gov.ph/articledetails.php?id=978

9 The PNP data show the same trend of declining reported cases of Violence Against Women from 1999 to 2005.

10 The DSWD does not get reports for ARMM.

11 On the regional distribution of data on child abuse, we were not able to get DSWD data for years other than 2006 and 2007 in time for this article.

Posted 08 September 2008.

 

Table 1. Number of Women in Especially Difficult Circumstances (WEDC) Served
By the Department of Social Welfare and Development, By Case Category: 1998-2007

Case Category 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
                     
  Total 7474 7763 7125 6074 5608 5703 5559 5440 5378 5359
Sexually abused 1076 1204 900 707 518 495 373 348 333 319
Physically abused/ maltreated/  battered 4083 3440 3184 2318 1405 1926 1557 1582 1,438 1,475
Illegal recruitment 198 119 151 530 99 102 162 74 45 102
Involuntary prostitution 231 239 171 147 164 91 85 141 75 32
Armed Conflict/ Trafficking 604 53 43 839 45 96 94 117 53 174
In Detention 52 60 98 59 10 59 62 62 71  
Others1 1230 2648 2578 1474 1702     1229   954
Uncategorized 2         1665 2934 3226 1887 3,363 2303

Notes:
1 Others includes HIV patients/potentials, strandees, abandoned, emotionally distressed, unwed mothers, sexually exploited, voluntary committed/surrendered and neglected victims of disaster
2 These are the estimated number of WEDC clients provided with crisis intervention services whose cases are not categorized.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Figure 1-A. Number of WEDC Served by DSWD, 1998 to 2007

 

Figure1-B. Number of WEDC Served by DSWD by Case Category, 1998-2007

 

Figure 2. Number of Physically Abused Women Served by DSWD by Region, 2000-2007

 

Table 2. Number Of Women In Especially Difficult Circumstances (WEDC) Served
By The Department of Social Welfare and Development, By Region: 2000-2007

Region Number of Cases Rank Based on the Number of Cases
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
NCR 1288 1677 1077 573 475 525 266 257 1 1 1 4 6 4 9 9
Regn. I 405 403 594 492 430 332 274 271 9 6 3 6 8 9 8 8
Regn. II 645 942 355 597 448 399 359 174 4 2 6 3 7 8 7 10
Regn. III 425 276 259 395 480 559 592 1011 8 8 10 8 5 3 4 1
Regn. IV 394 251 257 138 244 180 138 152 10 9 11 13 10 11 12 11
Regn. V 222 131 146 101 70 85 71 115 11 11 13 14 14 14 14 13
Regn. VI 64 116 127 156 144 116 100 71 15 12 14 12 13 13 13 14
Regn. VII 1051 467 525 564 598 416 377 519 2 4 4 5 3 7 6 4
Regn. VIII 177 104 192 162 145 215 157 502 12 13 12 11 12 10 11 5
Regn. IX 763 667 342 815 861 766 688 815 3 3 7 1 1 1 2 3
Regn. X 585 58 680 719 497 477 645 832 5 15 2 2 4 6 3 2
Regn. XI 483 412 330 331 669 486 1083 272 6 5 8 9 2 5 1 7
Regn. XII 108 188 262 168 149 172 211 126 13 10 9 10 11 12 10 12
CAR 437 288 416 468 318 675 395 381 7 7 5 7 9 2 5 6
CARAGA 78 94 46 24 31 37 22 51 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 15

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 3. Number of Women in Especially Difficult Circumstances (WEDC) Served
by the Department of Social Welfare and Development, by Region, By Case Category: 2007

Regions Total Sexually abused Physically abused/ maltreated/ battered Illegal recruitment Involuntary prostitution Armed Conflict/ Trafficking Others 1 Uncategorized2
  Total 5359 319 1475 102 32 174 954 2303
                 
National Capital Region 257 24 38 2 4 36 122 31
Cordillera Administrative 381 13 149 3 1 0 137 78
Ilocos Region 220 89 75 5 13 8 7 23
Cagayan Valley 164 16 118 16   3 11 0
Central Luzon 1011 24 136 7 2 35 195 612
CALABARZON 62 11 13 0 0 0 10 28
MIMAROPA 85   12       48 25
Bicol Region 110 5 11 0 1 0 31 62
Western Visayas 71 13 30 0     14 14
Central Visayas 519 22 185 27 0 58 103 124
Eastern Visayas 502 16 92 3   7 9 375
Zamboanga Peninsula 815 38 464 26 2 16 184 85
Northern Mindanao 832 15 19 8 0 3 18 769
Davao Region 153 30 48 5 1 0 40 29
SOCCSKSARGEN 126   85   8 8 25 0
Caraga 51 3 0 0 0 0 0 48

Notes:
1 Others includes HIV patients/potentials, strandees, abandoned, emotionally distressed, unwed mothers, sexually exploited, voluntary committed/surrendered and neglected victims of disaster

2 These are the estimated number of WEDC clients provided with crisis intervention services whose cases are not categorized.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Figure 3-A. Number of Reported Cases of Child Abuse Served by DSWD: 1998 to 2007

 

Figure 3-B. Number of Reported Child Abuse Served by DSWD, by Type of Abuse:
1998 to 2007

Note: Does not include cases of abduction, emotional abuse and others.

 

Table 4. Number of Reported Cases of Child Abuse Served by the DSWD
by Type of Abuse: 1998-2007

Type of Abuse 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
                     
Total 8,716 11,845 11,045 9,448 10,045 10,044 9,197 8,336 7,606 7,228
                     
Abandoned 2,032 1,168   977   985 1,079 1,134 1,026   936 1,039 878
Neglected 1,910 2,566 2,542 2,285 2,549 2,560 2,627 2,420 2,267 2249
Sexually abused 3,098 5,269 5,185 3,980 4,129 4,097 3,416 2,939 2,803 2,277
   Rape 1,710 2,726 2,823 2,192 2,259 2,395 1,981 1,634 1,526 1377
   Incest   880 1,912 1,681 1,245 1,332 1,189 1,084 1,018   921 692
   Acts of
   Lasciviousness
  436   631   681   543   538   513   351   287   356 208
   Not classified   72                  
Sexually exploited   118   353   235   249   284   311   348   267   244   165
   Victims of
   pedophilia
  51   41   40   21   32   51   43   19   7 17
   Victims of
   prostitution
  65   293   186   224   245   247   294   242   236 121
   Victims of
   pornography
  1   19   9   4   7   13   11   6   1 27
   Others   1                  
Physically abused/maltreated 1,256 1,784 1,606 1,445 1,440 1,370 1,214 1,009   796 863
Emotional Abuse                   9
Victims of child labor   261   560   350   412   358   268   333   268   231 285
Victims of Illegal recruitment - - -   21   21   30   54   24   14 77
Victims of Child trafficking   41   85   45   29   95   66   135   102   146 204
Abduction       1              
Victims of armed conflict -   60   104   42   90   208   44   371   66 184
   Involved               8   27   17 51
   Affected               36   344   49 133
Others                   37

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Figure 4-A. Percent Share of Clients Served by DSWD to Total Population: 2000-2007

chart

 

Figure 4-B. Distribution in the Number of Clients Served by DSWD (Among Individuals):
2000 to 2007

chart

 

Table 5.Number of Reported Cases of Child Abuse Served
by the Department of Social Welfare and Development
by Type of Abuse, by Region, by Age Group: 2007

Region Number of Child Abuse Cases Served Type of Abuse
Abandoned Neglected Sexually-Abused Sexually-Exploited
Total Rape Incest Acts of Lasciviousness Total Victims of Prostitution Victims of Pedophilia Victims of Pornography Victims of Cyber Pornography
Both Sexes Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
Total 7228 2397 4831 487 391 1127 1122 60 2217 46 1331 6 686 8 200 11 154   121 5 12   7 6 14
                                                   
NCR 701 222 479 76 44 81 64 5 202 1 112   69 4 21 5 73   57   2     5 14
CAR 331 132 199 23 9 63 61 5 88 5 57   24   7                    
I 579 233 346 48 49 37 45 1 203   138   49 1 16   10   10            
II 544 225 319 12 3 139 143 36 133 31 87 5 39   7   9   9            
III 1003 273 730 71 41 115 56 5 368 3 264   61 2 43 1 24   23 1 1        
IV-A 106 22 84 6 9 4 8 1 59 1 21   29   9   4   2   2        
IV-B 71 26 45 2 3 3 4   27   15   4   8 1 5   1 1 4        
V 149 33 116 11 9 18 21 1 74 1 27   36   11   2   2            
VI 189 38 151 27 33 9 5   84   53   26   5   4   4            
VII 778 257 521 43 31 117 134 3 237 2 132   86 1 19 1 13   6 1     7    
VIII 442 130 312 13 16 100 136   123   76   38   9 1 3   3 1          
IX 1429 552 877 74 75 316 322 2 261 1 148 1 84   29 1 4   1   3     1  
X 172 27 145 3 6 3 10   107   69   33   5 1 2   2 1          
XI 441 149 292 36 33 98 95 1 115 1 56   49   10   1   1            
XII 228 69 159 34 21 23 17   91   54   36   1                    
CARAGA 65 9 56 8 9 1 1   45   22   23                        
                                                   
Age Group 7228 2397 4831 487 391 1127 1122 60 2217 46 1331 6 686 8 200 11 154   121 5 12   7 6 14
                                                   
0 to below 1 494 246 248 98 76 129 151   3   2       1                    
1 to below 5 1157 560 597 180 140 319 336 3 77 3 51   12   14   1   1            
5 to below 10 1508 642 866 119 86 309 285 23 314 17 189 4 86 2 39 2 16   9   4     2 3
10 to below 14 1731 480 1251 54 42 215 201 21 742 17 408 2 270 2 64 7 24   8 3 6   7 4 3
14 to below 18 2338 469 1869 36 47 155 149 13 1081 9 681   318 4 82 2 113   103 2 2       8
                                                   

 

Region Type of Abuse
Physically Abused/ Maltreated Emotional Abuse Victims of Child Labor Victims of Illegal Recruitment Victims of Child Trafficking Victims of Armed Conflict Others
Total Involved Affected
Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female
Total 459 404   9 62 223   77 25 179 160 24 38 13 122 11 6 31
                                     
NCR 34 45     16 3       45             5 3
CAR 39 38       1   1   1 2       2      
I 23 19       8       2 124 9 10 3 114 6   1
II 36 19       5     2 7                
III 59 69     13 142   7 8 11             1 3
IV-A 4 4   9 1       6                  
IV-B 7 3     5         2 8 1 8     1    
V 2 3       1     1 1   5   3   2    
VI 2 17           4   2               2
VII 88 62       2   6 3 34 2       2     2
VIII 15 11               9 1 6 1 4   2   8
IX 110 62     24 31   52 3 55 22 3 19 3 3     12
X 18 10       1     2 9                
XI 13 24       17   7     1       1      
XII 9 17     3 12       1                
CARAGA   1                                
                                     
Age Group 459 404   9 62 223   77 25 179 160 24 38 13 122 11 6 31
                                     
0 to below 1 16 15             3 3                
1 to below 5 45 40             9 3 4   4          
5 to below 10 176 130     6 19     3 7 3 1 2 1 1   1 8
10 to below 14 147 119   1 16 91     4 17 15 5 5 3 10 2 1 9
14 to below 18 75 100   8 40 113   77 6 149 138 18 27 9 111 9 4 14

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Figure 5-A.Distribution of Families Served by DSWD, by Region: 2007

chart

Figure 5-B. Distribution of Women Served by DSWD, by Region: 2007

chart

Figure 5-C. Distribution of Youth Served by DSWD, by Region: 2007

chart

Figure 5-D. Distribution of Children Served by DSWD, by Region: 2007

chart

Figure 5-E. Distribution of Senior Citizens Served by DSWD, by Region: 2007

chart

 

Table 6.1. Number of Clients Served by the Department of Social Welfare and Development
by Client Category: 2000 - 2007

Type of Client Total Number of Clients Served by DSWD
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
                 
Families 243,832 354,512 360,667 252,369 237,009 1,387,260 1,838,891 1,200,210
Women 1   41,311 37,901 29,387   5,703   5,559 5,440 174,373 16,880
Youth   14,915 14,776   7,409   5,682   5,091 6,359 5,519 11,223
Children   42,052 37,760 89,182 75,187 81,176 139,513 65,611 47,356
Elderly 2 5,719   3,410   1,910   2,016   2,228 2,260 3,065 3,286

Notes:

1 Data for women in 2006 include women served in Crisis Intervention Units (CIU), victims of disasters, strandees, deportees, etc.

2 Data for 2000 still includes disabled.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 6.2. Percent Share of Clients Served by the Department of Social Welfare and Development to Total Population by Client Category: 2000 - 2007 1

Type of Client Percent Share of Clients Served by DSWD
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
                 
Families   1.62   2.28   2.25   1.53   1.34   7.35 10.57   6.44
Women 2   0.11   0.10   0.07   0.01   0.01   0.01   0.40   0.04
Youth   0.07   0.06   0.03   0.02   0.02   0.03   0.02   0.04
Children   0.13   0.11   0.26   0.21   0.23   0.38   0.18   0.12
Elderly 3   0.13   0.07   0.04   0.04   0.05   0.04   0.06   0.06

Notes:

1 Data for the computation of the total population were estimated as follows:

a. Total Families were estimated using the Family Income and Expenditure Survey and annual average growth rate of families, 2000-2003 and 2003-2006
b. Total population for women are based on the 2000-Based Population Projections
c. Total population for the youth, children and senior citizens were estimated using 2000 Census of Population and Housing and 2000-2007 annual average growth rate of population

2 Data for women in 2006 include women served in Crisis Intervention Units (CIU), victims of disasters, strandees, deportees, etc.

3 Data for 2000 still includes disabled.

Source: Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

Table 7. Number of Clients Served by the Department of Social Welfare and Development
by Client Category, by Region: 2007

Region 2007 POPULATION Clients Served by DSWD in 2007*
Families1 Women2 Youth3 Children3 Senior Citizen3 Families Women Youth Children Senior Citizens
Philippines4 18,624,881 44,098,000 25,777,469 38,166,089 5,249,101 1,200,210 16,880 11,223 47,356 3,286
                     
NCR 2,385,218 5,644,700 3,735,279 4,294,715 538,779 34,328 3,372 1,343 12,446 1,347
Region I 971,395 2,426,500 1,299,824 1,882,378 364,428 11,689 283 245 2,788 53
Region II 630,662 1,562,900 869,188 1,345,661 194,205 90,630 473 4 1,175 52
Region III 1,943,640 4,774,400 2,861,127 4,004,705 578,609 41,284 1037 111 5,656 102
Region IV-A 2,272,663 5,597,300 3,463,467 4,837,860 635,054 120,555 67 311 5,026 425
Region IV-B 561,476 1,363,600 700,879 1,214,822 144,472 37,784 85 115 1,634 95
Region V 1,032,250 2,639,200 1,345,859 2,429,043 341,204 160,267 596 123 866 177
Region VI 1,406,338 3,547,600 1,920,189 2,952,046 519,721 143,645 78   62 1,625  
Region VII 1,320,281 3,299,400 1,824,559 2,749,375 457,015 49,191 2405 744 3,701 399
Region VIII 835,257 2,053,700 1,014,628 1,833,182 292,073 107,142 635 149 1,319 29
Region IX 636,045 1,619,800 895,337 1,459,294 162,744 75,347 3775 7,358 5,509 385
Region X 805,712 2,019,200 1,142,552 1,787,676 213,052 43,538 688 197 1,425 19
Region XI 851,432 2,035,600 1,236,791 1,831,680 215,524 61,578 2360 336 2,146 74
Region XII 762,516 1,878,900 1,192,477 1,842,245 181,253 89,054 593   18 947  
CAR 310,599 784,100 450,341 667,624 96,116 40,498 382 4 811   71
ARMM 544,101 1,673,200 1,259,469 1,933,194 131,101 32,719        
Caraga 454,301 1,177,900 619,813 1,088,033 135,463 60,961 51 103 282   58

 

Region Percent Share of Clients Served
by DSWD to Population (%)
Families Women Youth Children Senior Citizens
Philippines4 6.44 0.04 0.04 0.12 0.06
           
NCR 1.44 0.06 0.04 0.29 0.25
Region I 1.20 0.01 0.02 0.15 0.01
Region II 14.37 0.03 0.00 0.09 0.03
Region III 2.12 0.02 0.00 0.14 0.02
Region IV-A 5.30 0.00 0.01 0.10 0.07
Region IV-B 6.73 0.01 0.02 0.13 0.07
Region V 15.53 0.02 0.01 0.04 0.05
Region VI 10.21 0.00 0.00 0.06 -
Region VII 3.73 0.07 0.04 0.13 0.09
Region VIII 12.83 0.03 0.01 0.07 0.01
Region IX 11.85 0.23 0.82 0.38 0.24
Region X 5.40 0.03 0.02 0.08 0.01
Region XI 7.23 0.12 0.03 0.12 0.03
Region XII 11.68 0.03 0.00 0.05 -
CAR 13.04 0.05 0.00 0.12 0.07
ARMM 6.01 - - - -
Caraga 13.42 0.00 0.02 0.03 0.04

Notes:

1 Estimated using 2006 Family Income and Expenditure Survey and 2003-2006 Annual Average Growth Rate of Families

2 Based on 2000-Based Population Projections

3 Estimated using 2000 Census of Population and Housing and 2000-2007 Annual Average Growth Rate of Population

4 Details may not add up to the total population since annual population growth rate was used and not the total of the regional estimates

* Department of Social Welfare and Development

 

 

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